Learn Photo Editing

Learn Photo Editing

This online course gives professional advice and instructions for how to photoshop pictures for any purpose that you could need them for. If you need to retouch your portraits, this gives you the tools to edit the image so that your model is sure to be happy with the results. If you need to create cartoon characters, you can learn how to do that in a very short amount of time. You can even learn the more advanced skills, like how to make facial features stand out in the picture without having to retouch the photo. You can learn how to take your normal photos and turn them into glossy, high resolution advertisements. Whatever skills you want to learn, and whatever application your photos will be needed in, this course can give you the tools that you need in order to create the most beautiful photoshoot that you've ever done. Continue reading...

Learn Photo Editing Overview

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Highly Recommended

It is pricier than all the other ebooks out there, but it is produced by a true expert and includes a bundle of useful tools.

All the modules inside this ebook are very detailed and explanatory, there is nothing as comprehensive as this guide.

Introduction to Adobe Photoshop CS2

Welcome to Adobe Photoshop CS2 Revealed. This book offers creative projects, concise instructions, and complete coverage of basic to advanced Photoshop skills, helping you create dynamic Photoshop art Use this book as you learn Photoshop, and then use it later as your own reference guide. This text is organized into 16 chapters plus additional online bonus content. In these chapters, you will learn many skills including how to work with layers, make selections, adjust color techniques, use paint tools, work with filters, transform type, liquify an image, annotate and automate a Photoshop document, and create Photoshop images for the Web The online appendices provide additional coverage on Adobe Bridge and offer extra practice in creating eye-catching projects and effects. The online content is available for downloading from www.course.com Revealed photoshopcs2.

About designing Web pages with Photoshop and Image Ready

When designing Web pages using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady, keep in mind the tools and features that are available in each application. Photoshop provides tools for creating and manipulating static images for use on the Web. You can divide an image into slices, add links and HTML text, optimize the slices, and save the image as a Web page. ImageReady provides many of the same image-editing tools as Photoshop. In addition, it includes tools and palettes for advanced Web processing and creating dynamic Web images like animations and rollovers. You can integrate your Web production process by opening Photoshop files directly in Adobe GoLive. Slices, URLs, and other Web features in Photoshop files are accessible in GoLive for management and editing. You can also open Photoshop files in GoLive as page templates. Page templates display as a shaded preview and provide a visual guide for building a Web page in GoLive. For more information on using GoLive, see the Adobe GoLive User...

Slicing an image in Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop lets you define slices using the slice tool or by converting layers into slices. You'll begin the lesson by slicing parts of a banner image for buttons using the slice tool in Photoshop. You'll name the slices and link them to URL addresses, and then optimize the slices. Then you'll continue slicing the banner image in ImageReady and create rollovers for the button slices. About designing Web pages with Photoshop and ImageReady When designing Web pages using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady, keep in mind the tools and features that are available in each application. Photoshop provides tools for creating and manipulating static images for use on the Web. You can divide an image into slices, add links and HTML text, optimize the slices, and save the image as a Web page. ImageReady provides many of the same image-editing tools as Photoshop. In addition, it includes tools and palettes for advanced Web processing and creating dynamic Web images such as animations and...

3 Basic Photo Corrections

Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady include a variety of tools and commands for improving the quality of a photographic image. This lesson steps you through the process of acquiring, resizing, and retouching a photo intended for a print layout. The same workflow applies to Web images. Apply the Unsharp Mask filter to finish the photo-retouching process. Save an Adobe Photoshop file in a format that can be used by a page-layout program. This lesson will take about 45 minutes to complete. The lesson is designed to be done in Adobe Photoshop, but information on using similar functionality in Adobe ImageReady is included where appropriate. If needed, remove the previous lesson folder from your hard drive, and copy the Lesson03 folder onto it. As you work on this lesson, you'll overwrite the start file. If you need to restore the start files, copy them from the Adobe Photoshop 7.0 Classroom in a Book CD.

Praise for Jeff Foster's After Effects and Photoshop

Choosing to write a book about either Adobe Photoshop or Adobe After Effects poses quite a challenge. Taking on the task of writing a book that covers both multiplies that challenge, but also offers a unique perspective into the creative possibilities these applications have not only individually, but in tandem. For anyone who uses both applications, this is a must-read. With the book you hold in your hands, Jeff Foster has created the one indispensble, and definitive, production guide to two of the world's greatest symbiotic tools After Effects and Photoshop. One has to be an expert in Photoshop to really make After Effects fly, the two programs being joined at their very core. And one also needs a professional understanding of traditional cinematic and animation timing and effects as well as directing material in 3D space to fully take advantage of the capabilities of Adobe's most powerful siblings. Jeff has this expertise in spades, and he combines his many years of professional...

Specifying 8-bit color display (Photoshop)

When you're working with a display system that supports 8-bit color, the monitor displays only 256 different colors at a time. As a result, Adobe Photoshop uses a technique called dithering to mix pixels of available colors and thus simulate colors not currently available. By default, Adobe Photoshop uses pattern dithering, which can result in a distinctive pattern of darker or lighter areas in the image. In contrast, diffusion dithering eliminates this distinctive patterning by using the surrounding pixels in the mix of pixel color. But diffusion dithering can cause visual inconsistencies when only part of a screen is redrawn as you scroll, edit, or paint. Keep in mind that dithering effects only appear on-screen, not in print.

Start Photoshop (Windows)

Point to All Programs, then click Adobe Photoshop CS2, as shown in Figure 1 if the Scratch volume dialog box opens, click OK, then click No. TIP The Adobe Photoshop CS2 program might be found in the Start menu (the left edge below your name), or in the Adobe folder, which is in the Program Files folder on the hard drive (Win).

Why Photoshop Integration is Important for Sony Vegas

At some point, the Vegas user may need the services of an image editing application, and Adobe Photoshop is the natural choice. With Photoshop, you can create a title graphic, tweak an alpha mask, re-touch a still image, or convert a vector graphic to a raster graphic for a Vegas project.

Opening Photoshop files as animations

You can easily create animated GIFs from existing one-layer-per-frame images in Adobe Photoshop file format or from a group of single-layer images. You can make each layer in a multilayer Photoshop file a separate frame in the Animation palette. The layers are placed in the Animation palette in their stacking order, with the bottom layer becoming the first frame. You can also import a folder of files and use each file as a frame in ImageReady. Files can be in any format that ImageReady supports. Each file becomes a frame in the Animation palette. The files are placed in the Animation palette in alphabetical order by image filename.

Jumping to Image Ready

Jumping between the applications lets you use the full feature sets of both applications when preparing graphics for the Web or other purposes, yet still maintain a streamlined workflow. 1 In the Photoshop toolbox, click the Jump To ImageReady button ( nv ). The 01Start.psd file opens in ImageReady. You can jump between Photoshop and ImageReady to transfer an image between the two applications for editing, without closing or exiting the originating application. In addition, you can jump from ImageReady to other graphics-editing applications and HTML-editing applications installed on your system. For more information on jumping to other applications in ImageReady, see Photoshop 7.0 online Help. 2 In ImageReady, click the Jump To Photoshop button ( -) in the toolbox to return to Photoshop, or choose File > Jump To > Adobe Photoshop 7.0. Each time an image in Photoshop or ImageReady is updated with changes made in a jumped-to application, a single...

Choosing basic optimization settings in Image Ready

Earlier in this lesson, you used Photoshop optimization settings that were integrated into the Save For Web dialog box. In ImageReady, the same options appear in the Optimize palette. 1 In ImageReady, choose File > Open, and open the file 14Start2.psd from the Lessons Lesson14 folder. This image was created in Adobe Illustrator, and then rasterized into Photoshop format. The image contains many areas of solid color. One of the ways to reduce image file size is to reduce the number of colors in the image. Photoshop can calculate the most needed colors for you, based on any of several available algorithms. You specify which algorithm is used by making a selection from the Color Reduction Algorithm menu, which includes the following options -From Adobe Photoshop 7.0 online Help

Applying Photoshop color settings

In this section, I explain how to specify each setting in the Photoshop Color Settings window. This is one of the most overlooked steps in color management and it makes a huge difference when used properly. Additionally, I explain when and how to assign a color profile to an image. If most of your work involves preparing images for the Web, for printing, or for publishing, each of those tasks will need a different monitor setting. The first step after calibrating your monitor (which I show you how to do in the later section, Getting Calibrated) is to set up your default color settings in Photoshop. Here's how Change the Photoshop default for the RGB working space to Adobe RGB (1998), as shown in Figure 3-5. Adobe RGB (1998) is the best working space for photographers, providing the widest color gamut for color saturation. Make sure to leave the CMYK, Gray, and Spot selections set at the defaults. For most of your image editing, use Adobe RGB (1998) to edit your master images. If you...

Making Photoshop Color Settings

In addition to making monitor calibration part of your color management workflow, it's equally as important to make sure the Photoshop color settings are correct for the type of images you normally process. If you work with photographs that are meant for a variety of output methods, you need the custom color settings in Photoshop. You don't want to expend a lot of energy shooting photos only to have them turn out wrong when you output your images to print or screen. Managing color properly can save you the hassle by getting your colors right so make color settings the very first stop in your image-editing workflow.

Using Photoshop's toning toots

You have a couple more ways to work with tonality in Photoshop the toning tools. These two brush-using tools let you paint corrections on your image, giving you incredible control over the appearance. Select the Burn tool to darken or the Dodge tool to lighten. Select a brush tip in the Options bar and drag the tool in your image to apply the correction. (Read about controlling the brush-using tools and that incredibly-complex Brushes palette in Chapter 14.) In Figure 5-19, you see the Burn tool darkening a specific area of the fence on the right.

Streamlining Your Work in Photoshop

Taking advantage of Photoshop's built-in automation commands Working with Actions Using prerecorded scripts J lot of the work that you do in Photoshop is fun experimenting with filters, applying creative adjustments, cloning over former in-laws, that sort of thing. A bunch of your work, though, is likely to be repetitive, mundane, and even downright boring. That's where automation comes in. If a task isn't fun to do, if you need to speed things up, or if you need to ensure that the exact same steps are taken time after time, automation is for you. I open the chapter with a look at some of Photoshop's major automation features commands that help you quickly and easily create presentations and contact sheets. Next, I show you a couple of production-oriented commands that let you print multiple images on a single sheet of paper (and we know how much money that can save ) and how to save time by scanning multiple images in a single pass and then automatically separating them into...

Editing in Elements or Photoshop

Here are the steps for launching either Photoshop Elements or Photoshop Choose EditOEdit with (your designated image editor). The name that appears in the menu depends on whether you chose Elements or Photoshop as your editor in the Preferences dialog box (as described in Specifying an External Image Editor in Album earlier in this chapter). 4. Edit the photo in either Elements or Photoshop. You can easily jump to an external image editor from the Fix Photo dialog box. You can easily jump to an external image editor from the Fix Photo dialog box. Album locks your image while you edit it in an external image editor. Album locks your image while you edit it in an external image editor. Although you can jump to Image Ready from Photoshop, you can't use Image Ready on an image you opened from Album. 5. Choose FileOSave and close the photo in your image editor. In either Elements or Photoshop, you also can choose the FileO Save As command and rename the edited photo (for example filename_...

Drag and Drop Graphics from Photoshop into Other Programs

Whereas the previous tip discussed dragging and dropping files into Photoshop, this one discusses the opposite dragging and dropping files from Photoshop into other programs. In particular, I find it quite useful to drag and drop print graphics from Photoshop right into Adobe InDesign. Although you still want to save a copy in a print-ready format such as TIFF or EPS, you can save some time by dragging it into InDesign instead of closing the file in Photoshop and then reopening it in the other program. InDesign treats elements that are dropped into its page layouts as links that can be easily updated. TRY IT To drag and drop content from Photoshop into another program, such as InDesign, first create or open the file in the other program to give yourself a place in which to drop the Photoshop image. Minimize or shrink that program's document window so you can see both it and your Photoshop file at the same time. (Minimize or shrink the Photoshop window too if needed.) Once you can see...

Other things you can do with Photoshop

Although Photoshop is not a page layout or illustration program, you certainly can produce simple brochures, posters, greeting cards, and the like using only Photoshop. (See Figure 1-4.) One of the features that sets Photoshop apart from basic image editors is its powerful type engine, which can add, edit, format, and stylize text as capably as many word processing programs. Photoshop even has a spell check feature not bad for a program that's designed to work with photos, eh Figure 1-4 You can use Photoshop to create cards, posters, and brochures. Figure 1-4 You can use Photoshop to create cards, posters, and brochures. Photoshop CS2 takes yet another giant step toward filling in for InDesign or Illustrator with the introduction of Smart Objects. Smart Objects can be created in Photoshop through the Layers palette or pasted into your artwork from Illustrator. A Smart Object is a designer's dream. You add the Smart Object to your project then, you can edit the original file and have...

What Major Photoshop Features Import?

Final Cut Pro lets you import multilayered Photoshop files. It is possible to import any version of Photoshop files, but only those features that work in Photoshop 3.0 features are supported. Supported features include opacity, composite modes, layer order, and layer name. The following properties transfer correctly from Photoshop When importing a multilayered Photoshop document, Final Cut Pro creates a new sequence. All of the layers of the Photoshop file are composited together. The sequence uses a frame size identical to the imported file's frame size.

Use the Open Command to Bring an Existing Bitmap File into Photoshop

When you want to open an existing digital file in Photoshop, you have to first consider the file's format. Photoshop and ImageReady are capable of opening the file formats listed in Table 3-4. Photoshop ImageReady Photoshop (.psd, .pdd) Photoshop EPS (.eps) Photoshop DCS 1.0 (.eps) Photoshop DCS 2.0 (.eps) Photoshop PDF (.pdf, .pdp) Table 3-4 File Formats Supported by Photoshop and ImageReady Table 3-4 File Formats Supported by Photoshop and ImageReady

Welcome to Photoshop!

What Photoshop does very well, kind of well, and just sort of, well . . . Taking a look at what you need to know to work with Photoshop J dobe Photoshop is, without question, the leading image editing program in the world. Photoshop has even become somewhat of a cultural icon. It's not uncommon to hear Photoshop used as a verb (That picture is obviously Photoshopped ), and you'll even see references to Photoshop in the daily comics and cartoon strips. And now you're part of this whole gigantic phenomenon called Photoshop. You might have purchased Photoshop as a new full version, as an upgrade, or as part of the Adobe Creative Suite. The Creative Suite (that's where the CS comes from) comes in two versions. The Standard Edition includes Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator (for creating vector-based artwork), and Adobe InDesign (for page layout work). The Premium Edition also includes Adobe GoLive (for Web design) and Adobe Acrobat (to create PDF documents). Whether you're new to Photoshop,...

Starting Photoshop and Creating a File

The way that you start Photoshop depends on the computer platform you are using. However, when you start Photoshop in either platform, the computer displays a splash screen, a window that displays information about the software, and then the Photoshop window opens. After you start Photoshop, you can create a file from scratch. You use the New dialog box to create a file. You can also use the New dialog box to set the size of the image you're about to create by typing dimensions in the Width and Height text boxes. in Photoshop Photoshop Photoshop Encapsulated Photoshop PDF

Drag and Drop Graphics from Other Programs into Photoshop

Programs created by Adobe are usually quite compatible with each other. For example, suppose you created type on a curve in Adobe Illustrator and wanted to use it in your Photoshop imaging. (Photoshop, as of yet, does not allow you to create type on a curve without a plug-in see Creating Text Along a Path in Chapter 9.) The easiest way to get this or any vector path drawn in Illustrator into your Photoshop file is to drag and drop it. TRY IT To drag and drop content from another program, such as Illustrator, into Photoshop, first select or highlight the content in the other program. Minimize or shrink that program's document window so you can see both it and your Photoshop file at the same time. (Minimize or shrink the Photoshop window too if needed.) Once you can see both files at the same time (or at least portions of both), return to the original program and click and drag the selected content from that window into your Photoshop document. In the case of Illustrator content, you'll...

^Rasterize EPS Files Created in Other Programs in Photoshop

Photoshop will open most documents with the .eps extension. However, not all layers and vector art will appear as they did in the program with which the EPS was created. For example, Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop are quite compatible programs a lot of the shared features do actually cross over from program to program. You can copy and paste from program to program but layers will not be maintained. If you open an EPS file in Photoshop, the program rasterizes it, regardless of whether it was created in Illustrator or any other program. In other words, it converts all the information to pixels and not vectors. This is helpful, for instance, if you create a graphic in a vector-based drawing program and you want to incorporate it into an image you are creating in Photoshop. Another great use of this technique is in referencing an actual page layout (from a program like Illustrator) in a Photoshop design. Screen captures, although extremely helpful, capture information at a resolution...

Publications with Frequent Stories about Photoshop

There are several great computer magazines that routinely discuss Photoshop and related topics such as third-party plug-ins, motion graphics, and video. A magazine has a certain timeliness to it, and can provide excellent tips on Photoshop updates and add-ons. Photoshop User www.photoshopuser.com

To save a file in Photoshop DCS format:

1 Save the artwork, and choose Photoshop DCS 1.0, or Photoshop DCS 2.0 from the Format menu. (See Saving files on page 446.) The dialog box includes all the options available for Photoshop EPS files. For more information, see Saving files in Photoshop EPS format (Photoshop) on page 448. Additionally, the DCS menu gives you the option of creating a 72-ppi composite file that can be placed in a page layout application or used to proof the image

Exploring Adobe Photoshop

Photoshop is used for an incredible range of projects, ranging from editing and correcting digital photos to preparing images for magazines and newspapers to creating graphics for the Web. You'll also find Photoshop in the foren-sics departments of law enforcement agencies, scientific labs and research facilities, and dental and medical offices, as well as in classrooms, offices, studios, and homes around the world. As the Help Desk Director for the National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP), I solve problems and provide solutions for Photoshop users from every corner of the computer graphics field and from every corner of the world. People are doing some pretty amazing things with Photoshop, many of which are so far from the program's original roots that it boggles the mind

What Major Photoshop Features Import

Photoshop Layers are independently recognized by Combustion. Layers can be manipulated and modified individually or as a group. Photoshop Layers with visibility turned off will import into Combustion off and can be turned on by clicking the Layer icon in the Workspace. Photoshop Layer names are preserved on import. Photoshop Layer Blend Modes are compatible with Combustion Layer Transfer Modes and can be changed easily in Combustion. However, new (Photoshop 7) Layer Blend modes will import as Normal, these include Linear Burn, Linear Dodge, Vivid Light, Pin Light and Linear Light. Photoshop Layer Opacity imports perfectly and the full range of Opacity can be modified and animated in Combustion. The Advanced Blending Fill Opacity is not acknowledged. Photoshop Clipping Groups are imported seamlessly using Combustion's Stencil Layer option found in the Surface Controls. The Stencil Layer option is automatically set to Alpha.

Annotating images (Photoshop)

You can attach note annotations (notes) and audio annotations to an image in Photoshop. This is useful for associating review comments, production notes, or other information with the image. Because Photoshop annotations are compatible with Adobe Acrobat, you can use them to exchange information with Acrobat users as well as Photoshop users. To circulate a Photoshop document for review in Acrobat, save the document in Portable Document Format (PDF) and ask reviewers to use Acrobat to add notes or audio annotations. Then import the annotations into Photoshop. Notes and audio annotations appear as small nonprintable icons on the image. They are associated with a location on the image rather than with a layer. You can hide and show annotations, open notes to view or edit their contents, and play audio annotations. You can also add audio annotations to actions, and set them to play during an action or during a pause in an action. (See Setting playback options (Photoshop) on page 490.)

The Photoshop Desktop

After the launch process is complete, the Photoshop desktop consumes the foreground. Figure 2-3 shows the Photoshop 6 desktop as it appears when an image is open and all palettes are visible. Figure 2-3 The Photoshop 6 desktop as it looks on a 17-inch screen. Figure 2-3 The Photoshop 6 desktop as it looks on a 17-inch screen. Many of the elements that make up the Photoshop desktop are well known to folks familiar with the Windows environment. For example, the menu bar provides access to menus and commands. You can drag the title bar to move the image window. And the scroll bars let you look at hidden portions of the image. Other potentially less familiar elements of the Photoshop desktop work as follows Image window Like any halfway decent product, Photoshop lets you open multiple images at a time. Each open image resides inside its own window. Status bar Just above the Windows taskbar sits Photoshop's status bar, which provides running commentary on the active tool and image. (If the...

Preparing an Image Ready workspace

Before you begin working on a new file, you'll jump from Photoshop to ImageReady and then define an ImageReady workspace for the tasks you'll do in this section. 1 In Photoshop, click the Jump To ImageReady button ( , ) at the bottom of the toolbox to switch from Photoshop to ImageReady. Note If you do not have enough memory to run both applications simultaneously, quit Photoshop and then start ImageReady. 2 In ImageReady, choose Window > Workspace > Reset Palette Locations to make sure that all palettes are in their default positions.

To display file information in the document window (Photoshop):

Illustration of file information view options in Photoshop Document Size to display information on the amount of data in the image. The number on the left represents the printing size of the image approximately the size of the saved, flattened file in Adobe Photoshop format. The number on the right indicates the file's approximate size including layers and channels.

Using the Automate commands (Photoshop)

The Automate commands simplify complex tasks by combining them into one or more dialog boxes. Photoshop includes the following commands (third-party companies may provide additional commands) Multi-Page PDF to PSD converts each page of a PDF document you select to a separate Photoshop file. (See Opening and importing PDF files on page 74.) Web Photo Gallery generates a Web site from a set of images complete with a thumbnails index page, individual JPEG image pages, and navigable links. (See Creating Web photo galleries (Photoshop) on page 390.)

Use the Place Command to Import an Existing Vector File into Another File in Photoshop

Besides using the Open command to bring an existing vector file into Photoshop, you can also use the Place command. This command is more useful than the Open command in two distinct situations When you want to add an existing vector image to another file already open in Photoshop When you are unsure as to the ultimate size you'll use for the vector file in Photoshop jHY J To use the Place command to import an existing vector file into Photoshop, you must first have another file open in the program in which to place the file. Then, choose File I Place and locate the file from within the directory structure before clicking OK.

Become part of the Creative Photoshop community

Your exploration into the artistic side of working with Photoshop does not end with this book. Visit the Creative Photoshop website and explore the user forum. Share knowledge with, and ask questions of other readers. Be sure to post your finished images within the user forum for everyone else to see. Submit the works you've created by following the chapters here, or post your own work, showcasing your new creative Photoshop skills. Join the Creative Photoshop community at www.creativephotoshopthebook.com

Using the Equalize command (Photoshop)

The Equalize command redistributes the brightness values of the pixels in an image so that they more evenly represent the entire range of brightness levels. When you apply this command, Photoshop finds the brightest and darkest values in the composite image and remaps them so that the brightest value represents white and the darkest value represents black. Photoshop then attempts to equalize the brightness that is, to distribute the intermediate pixel values evenly throughout the grayscale.

Spell-Check Photoshop Text

Long awaited by Photoshop fans is the ability to spell-check text right within Photoshop. You can use the Check Spelling command to have Photoshop compare the words used in your document to those in its internal dictionary. When a word in your document is not found in Photoshop's dictionary, the program prompts you to change or ignore the misspelling, or add it to the dictionary, as shown in Figure 7-5. TRY u Before you can spell-check your document, you need to make sure the correct language is specified in the Character palette, so Photoshop knows which dictionary to use. Choose Window I Character to display the Character palette, and select the appropriate language from the menu at the bottom. The default is English USA.

Print Files Directly from Photoshop

As Photoshop's text-handling capabilities increase, so do the number of people using it as a print-layout tool. When you do use Photoshop as a print-layout tool, you'll likely be printing directly from Photoshop, as opposed to the more traditional route of printing from a page-layout program such as Adobe InDesign or QuarkXPress. In cases like this, use Photoshop's Print With Preview command to specify print options before actually sending the file to your printer. TRY IT To print files directly from Photoshop, ensure the file is ready to be printed and choose File I Print With Preview to access the Print dialog box. At the bottom of that dialog box, select Show More Options to display a window similar to this one, where you can adjust the settings as needed. For Scaled Print Size, adjust the scale as needed, or select Scale To Fit Media to force Photoshop to scale the design up or down to fit the page size. Alternatively, select Show Bounding Box and then click and drag an edge or...

Adding spot colors (Photoshop)

If you are planning to print an image with spot colors, you need to create spot channels to store the colors. To export spot channels, save the file in DCS 2.0 format or PDF. (See Saving files in Photoshop EPS format (Photoshop) on page 448.) Note ImageReady supports Photoshop spot color channels as alpha channels. About spot colors

Viewing animated images in Photoshop

When you open a file containing an animation in Photoshop, only the frame that was selected when you saved the file in ImageReady is displayed. You cannot edit the animation frames separately, play the animation, or save the animation as an animated GIF. If you add a new layer to the file while in Photoshop, the layer is added to all frames of the animation. However, the new layer will only appear in the selected frame when you reopen the file in ImageReady. If you change the stacking order of layers while in Photoshop, the stacking order of layers will be changed when you reopen the file in ImageReady.

Photoshop Layers and After Effects

At the root of the partnership of After Effects and Photoshop is the ability to transfer Photoshop layers to separate comp layers in After Effects and then edit the original as desired without having to replace or reimport layers. What may be 20 static layers in Photoshop can become 20 moving layers in After Effects.

About color modes and models (Photoshop)

A color mode determines the color model used to display and print images. Photoshop bases its color modes on established models for describing and reproducing color. Common models include HSB (hue, saturation, brightness) RGB (red, green, blue) CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black) and CIE L*a*b*. Photoshop also includes modes for specialized color output such as Indexed Color and Duotone. ImageReady uses RGB mode to work with images. You can set up the Info palette so that you can select any tool, position the pointer over any part of an image, and determine the color value under the pointer. You can customize the Info palette and color samplers to express color values using HSB, RGB, CMYK, Lab, or Grayscale modes without changing the mode of the image itself. (See Seeing the color values of pixels (Photoshop) on page 133 and the procedure to change Info palette options in Using the Info palette (Photoshop) on page 32.)

Photoshop's RAW Support

Photoshop CS now includes a Camera RAW plug-in (which was formerly an extra-cost option with Photoshop 7) that works quite well. It can be used only with the particular digital cameras that Adobe supports, typically from Nikon, Canon, or Konica Minolta and quite a few other vendors. In addition, Camera RAW supports the new Adobe Digital Negative (DNG) format. DNG is Adobe's attempt to create a common RAW format that can be used by all the different camera types. The list of supported cameras at the time this book was published is a long one, shown in Table 3.1 You can also expect that camera models introduced after Photoshop CS from the same vendors are also supported. For example, although the Canon EOS 350 XT and Konica Minolta A200 debuted after the original Photoshop CS, their RAW formats are similar to their predecessor models and are fully supported. You can find the latest updates that list compatible cameras at www.adobe.com.

Preview a Browser Tile in Photoshop

When you create your own background tiles in Photoshop, it's nice to be able to preview how they'll display when tiled by the browser in a web page. Luckily, you can do so by saving it as a pattern in Photoshop. TRY IT To preview a browser tile in Photoshop, follow these steps 1. Launch Photoshop and use the File Open command to open your background tile if it isn't already open.

^Import Sliced Photoshop Files into GoLive to Build HTML Code

Fit seamlessly with Photoshop and ImageReady. For instance, after you design a web page in Photoshop or ImageReady, you can drag it into a page layout file in GoLive to have that tool help you optimize the graphics and build the HTML code. TRY IT To import a sliced Photoshop file into GoLive, first open a copy of Adobe GoLive. If you already have a page to which you want to add the content of your sliced Photoshop file, choose File I Open and select the page to open. Otherwise, choose File I New Page to create a new web page in GoLive.

Praise for the Photoshop Bibles and Deke McClelland

You 're probably thinking that if someone has the gall to call his book a Bible, it had better be pretty good. If you're not thinking that, it's probably because you've already experienced the Photoshop Bible and you know it's good. Say goodbye to those dull and dusty step-by-step tutorials now that Deke McClelland, the Digital Guru of computer graphics, has updated his international bestseller, the Macworld Photoshop 5 Bible. A great program deserves a great book. Photoshop has one in this mammoth paperback (Photoshop Bible). I've been involved with Photoshop for over seven years, and for as long as I can remember, I've had Deke looking over my shoulder. Deke takes you through Photoshop and covers a lot of areas with impressive depth. Mark Hamburg, Adobe Principal Scientist and Architect for Photoshop It's always nice to see something that was very good become great bigger and better than its predecessor(which was already quite good), the Macworld Photoshop 5 Bible kicks some serious...

Using Photoshop's Auto Corrections

Adjusting the tonality of your image can be as simple as selecting one of the Auto commands from Photoshop's ImageOAdjustments menu. With many photos, the tonality (and even the color) jump to just the right look for your image. No muss, no fuss just a great-looking picture with a single command. Sometimes you need (or simply want) more control than offered by the Auto commands. You might have a more demanding problem or a more expansive artistic vision. You might need to make major corrections or create stupendous effects. Photoshop, not surprisingly, offers that sort of control over your image. In fact (and also not surprisingly), you have several ways at your disposal to manipulate the tonality of your images. Two of the most commonly used are Levels and Curves, both found in your ImageOAdjustments menu. Before I introduce you to those two commands, let me quickly explain and dismiss a couple of other available options. Since the early days of Photoshop, the Brightness Contrast...

Bringing Images into Photoshop

Artwork in Photoshop originates in one of three ways (as shown in Figure 4-1) Figure 4- 1 Open an image, scan an image, or create a new image to work in Photoshop. You can open an image into Photoshop with the FileOOpen command, through Adobe Bridge, or by double-clicking the image file. If you doubleclick a file and Photoshop doesn't launch or the wrong program launches, you need to associate the file format with Photoshop

Chapter 8. Using Photoshop CS's Filters

For a long time, Photoshop's use of filters remained quite stagnant, with few new filters added from release to release. Indeed, many of the best filters in the Photoshop arsenal dated back to Adobe's acquisition of Aldus Corporation, and its three Gallery Effects packages almost a decade ago. These 36 filters were eventually folded into Photoshop itself, and there were only a few minor additions to Photoshop's default array for many years. Now, Adobe has started to move forward again with interesting and effective filters. An increasing number of plug-ins are joining the Filter Gallery, which lets you preview and choose from among most of the filters that have their own sliders or other controls. Recent releases of Photoshop gave us new capabilities with filters like Fibers, Extract, Liquify, and Pattern Maker. Photoshop CS2 has added six brand new filters discussed elsewhere in this book, including Box Blur, Shape Blur, and Surface Blur Lens Correction Reduce Noise and Smart...

Jump to Image Ready for Animation and Rollovers

While Photoshop is certainly capable of optimizing static web graphics, it is not suited for animation or rollover effects. Therefore, to optimize animated GIFs or save the different states for your rollovers, you'll need to switch over to ImageReady. TRY IT If you already have a web design open in Photoshop that you want to use for animation or rollover effects in ImageReady, choose File I Jump To I Adobe ImageReady 7.0. Your computer will launch ImageReady (if it wasn't already open) and open another copy of the file in that program.

Part III: Creating "Art" in Photoshop

The chapters in Part III take a walk on the creative side. Although not everyone wants to use Photoshop as a digital painting program, everyone should understand how to get around in the complex and daunting Brushes palette. Compositing images (making one picture from two or more), adding text (whether a simple copyright notice or an entire page), using paths, and adding layer styles are all valuable skills for just about all folks who work with Photoshop (even if they don't consider their work to be art).

Rotoscoping Techniques with Photoshop

Rotoscoping is the process of animating, compositing, or editing individual frames of a video or film. Before computers were used in special effects, films were projected onto special animation stands, called rotoscopes, where animated characters could be traced or drawn to match the footage step-by-step. This process is now completed digitally, using software that can manipulate layers on each frame to be modified, such as After Effects and Photoshop. Roto Sequences Getting In and Out Blue-Screen Matte Rotoscoping Stabilizing and Rotoscoping Old Movies Colorizing Old Movies with Photoshop Layers

First Look at Photoshop

These days, most computer applications speak a common graphical language, and Photoshop is no exception. It subscribes to the basic structure of on-screen nouns and verbs proposed and first spoken by the operating system. As a result, Photoshop may seem tolerably comprehensible the first time you meet it. Without any prior knowledge of its origins or behavior, you should be able to pick up a paintbrush and specify a color in a matter of a few seconds, simply based on the rudimentary vocabulary that you've picked up from other programs. After years of staring into cathode ray tubes, you can't help but get the picture. But Photoshop has its own special dialect, one that differs from every other program out there. The dialect is so distinct that it's only peripherally understood by other applications, including those from Adobe, the very siblings that Photoshop grew up with. Photoshop has its own way of turning a phrase, it speaks its words in a different order than you might expect, and...

Basic Photoshop knowledge

Creative Photoshop is not a beginner's guide, nor is it exclusively for experts. It falls into that mysterious category in-between often referred to as intermediate. The idea of what an intermediate user does or does not know will often vary depending upon whom you're talking to. I have written this book assuming that you, as the reader, know your way around Photoshop and understand the basics. I am assuming that you have an idea of what the tools do, what layers are, the difference between vectors and pixels, etc. Numerous functions and tools within Photoshop will be explored in depth, via the step-by-step instructions in the following chapters, however you'll need to know the basics to follow along with ease. For those of you who possess more ambition than Photoshop know-how, I can certainly relate. As a beginner, I would've picked up this book too. My advice to those who are just starting out, is to get familiar with the Photoshop Help menu. Any time you get stuck, you can do a...

^Import Layered Photoshop Files into GoLive to Build Dhtml Code

When you import sliced Photoshop files into GoLive using the technique described in the previous tip, the file is placed as if it were a flattened Photoshop file. In other words, the individual layers in Photoshop are ignored. Suppose you wanted to import the text and graphic behind it separately, so they could each be moved independently on the web page in GoLive. To achieve this, you can actually import the layered Photoshop file right into GoLive. While GoLive typically uses HTML table tags to organize slices from Photoshop files, layered Photoshop files are handled differently. Instead of static HTML table tags, GoLive uses Dynamic HTML (DHTML) to lay out the individual elements, which are called floating boxes in GoLive. The benefit of using DHTML is that each element's movements can be dynamically scripted on the page. For example, you could script a section of the page to disappear when a user clicks a certain button. To import a layered Photoshop file into GoLive to build...

Using the File Browser (Photoshop)

The Photoshop File Browser The Photoshop File Browser Displaying the File Browser Choose File > Browse or Window > File Browser. By default, the File Browser is displayed in the palette well. To display the File Browser in a separate window, choose Show in Separate Window from the palette menu. For more information on using palettes in the palette well, see Using the palette well (Photoshop) on page 26.

Painting in Photoshop

Or, perhaps, images of rollers and buckets, color being slopped on a wall and spread around. It doesn't generally bring to mind digital image editing. But painting certainly has a place in your arsenal of Photoshop skills, even if you never create an image from scratch. In addition to painting landscapes and portraits (which you certainly can do in Photoshop, if you have the talent and training), you use Photoshop's painting tools for a variety of other tasks. For example, you can paint to create masks and layer masks, adjust tonality or sharpness in specific areas, repair blemishes and other damage in an image even to create graphic elements and special effects. In this chapter, I concentrate on those editing-related painting skills rather than fine art painting. I introduce you to the basic concepts of painting in Photoshop and also walk you through the basic brush-related tools and the Brushes palette, concentrating on those features that you most...

Comparing Photoshop Elements and Photoshop

If you're interested in purchasing an external digital-imaging application, I highly recommend either Photoshop Elements or Photoshop, depending on your needs and budget. Trust me I'm not being paid to endorse these products. It's just that if you use either of these Adobe products you'll have the benefit of seamless integration with Album. You can purchase Elements for about 90. Photoshop will set you back a hefty 600 or so. (Ouch.) If you're not sure whether you want to make the investment, download a 30-day, fully-functioning trial version of either program from www.adobe.com.

Identifying out-of-gamut colors (Photoshop)

The gamut is the range of colors that a color system can display or print. A color that can be displayed in RGB or HSB models may be out-of-gamut, and therefore unprintable, for your CMYK setting. (See Color gamuts (Photoshop) on page 91.) Photoshop automatically brings all colors into gamut when you convert an image to CMYK. But you might want to identify the out-of-gamut colors in an image or correct them manually before converting to CMYK.

Slicing the image in Image Ready

You've already learned several ways to create and work with slices in Photoshop, all of which can also be done in ImageReady. Although the options sometimes appear in different locations in the two applications, you can also use either Photoshop or ImageReady to create slices from guides or layers and to optimize individual slices. In this part of the lesson, you'll use ImageReady to convert a layer into a slice, create a No Image slice, and create a precisely shaped slice from a selection. Later in the lesson, you'll work with the Rollovers palette a feature unique to ImageReady to build interactivity into your images. You'll start by jumping directly from Photoshop to ImageReady. When you use the Jump To feature to go back and forth between Photoshop and ImageReady, the currently active file also jumps with you, opening in the target application. 1 In the Photoshop toolbox, click the Jump to ImageReady button ,). The 15Start.psd file opens in ImageReady. Notice that the ImageReady...

Optimizing slices in Photoshop

You can use Photoshop slices to optimize individual areas of the image, which is useful when some areas of the image require greater resolution or settings than the rest of the image. You optimize one or more slices by selecting them in the Save For Web dialog box, choosing optimization settings, and saving optimized files for either the selected slices or all slices. Photoshop creates an Images folder to contain the optimized files. Photoshop saves the optimized images in an Images folder within the Architech Pages folder and uses the names you specified in the Slice Options dialog box for the filenames. If there are any gaps in the table, Photoshop creates a Spacer.gif file.

Working with image maps (Image Ready)

An image map is an image that contains multiple hypertext links to other files on the Web. Different areas, or hotspots, of the image map link to different files. Adobe ImageReady creates client-side image maps and server-side image maps. Creating image maps is one of the functions that you must do in Adobe ImageReady. You can use Photoshop to create slices, which share certain functionality with image maps, but you cannot create image maps with Photoshop. Creating and viewing image maps (ImageReady) -From Adobe Photoshop 7.0 online Help

^Create a New Print Design File in Photoshop

When you begin your work in Photoshop, usually you will have document dimensions already established (8.5x11 inches). You can set up your Photoshop document with these dimensions or estimate the approximate size of the graphic space you will be using within the document layout (for example, 3x5 inches). If you do not know how big to build your graphic, always build it larger than you need it. You can always reduce the size without losing digital quality. However, if you have built the file too small, the image will become pixelated and fuzzy if you attempt to increase the image dimensions. Adobe Photoshop 7.0 Info B Adobe Photoshop 7.0 Adobe Photoshop 7.0 Show Memory t Figure 2-9 The Memory Requirements options for Photoshop on the Mac O S I also recommend establishing a larger canvas size than your actual image size. A larger canvas gives you space to move things around and shove things off to the side, plus it gives you the added bonus of being able to see all the handles of a...

Import a File into Photoshop Using the Twain Interface

Most scanners come with a utility or plug-in that allows you to scan your images right into Photoshop. The utility or plug-in uses the industry-standard TWAIN interface to import the scan. Before you can scan an image, you must make sure the utility or plug-in is installed properly and is working with Photoshop. Consult the documentation that came with your scanner if you're unsure about how to install the software. If you can't find your documentation, check the company's web site for an updated plug-in (some companies may call the scanner plug-in a driver).

Specifying an External Image Editor in Album

If you have another digital-imaging application installed on your computer, you can jump to that application directly from Album to edit your images. But what if you're lucky enough to have more than one image editor installed on your system Well, you can instruct Album to choose one over the other by setting it as the default editor in the Preferences file. Here's how 3. If you have an Adobe image-editing program, choose either Photoshop Elements 2.0 or later or Photoshop 6.0 or later. If you have another image-editing program, you have two choices Default Application for File Type This option launches the image-editing program associated with the type of file you have selected. During the installation of programs like Elements and Photoshop, you have the option of associating the particular application with various file types. For example, if you are in Windows Explorer or at the desktop whenever you double-click a TIFF or JPEG, you can specify that Elements is launched. Similarly,...

Selection Tools In Photoshop

Making selections is the core of Photoshop's way of working.There are a variety of tools you can use for the purpose, so let's take a look at how to get the most out of them In earlier versions of Photoshop there was no Select tool - one that looked like a traditional arrow cursor, that you would use to select 'objects'. Because Photoshop dealt primarily with pixels, it made no sense to have a Select tool - there were no 'objects' to select. Instead, the selection tools were default tools - ones you used automatically, to begin editing. In Photoshop 7.0 there is an arrow tool for selecting objects, since the introduction of vector shapes (those drawn using a series of points or 'vectors') made this necessary. Despite this, the selection tools, in their many and varied forms, are still the main tools for doing 90 of the tasks in Photoshop. Selections are an essential part of understanding Photoshop's methods and central to the way the program works - making a selection then performing...

Unravel the mysteries of the Photoshop Toolbar and its resident icons.They're not as scary as they l

Start up Photoshop and what do you see Well, besides the menu options along the top of the screen, you'll see a Toolbar that's chock-a-block with icons. You'll probably recognise some of these, such as the 'T' that designates the Type tool and the paintbrush icon that unlocks the various Brush tools. But do you really know what the rest of these icons mean Honestly The chances are that - like many Photoshop users across the world - you're only using a fraction of the program's full potential, but this second issue in the Photoshop Focus Guide series will change all that, helping you make the most of all the tools at your disposal. Even professional designers often admit to being hopeless with the Healing Brush and dodgy with the Dodge tool, but there's really no reason for any of the tools to be a mystery. This issue will help you get more from the Clone, Gradient, Paths and Effects tools, to name but a few. You'll find expert tips and advice for working more efficiently with each of...

To save a file in Photoshop PDF format:

1 Save the artwork, and choose Photoshop PDF from the Format menu. (See Saving files on page 446.) Save Transparency Preserves transparency when the file is opened in another application. (Transparency is always preserved when the file is reopened in Photoshop or ImageReady.) This option is not available if the file contains a spot color channel.

Previewing outside Photoshop

In fact, provided you save the image in the * native Photoshop (.psd) format, you can peek at an image without even opening the program. Right-click a file with a .psd extension either at the desktop, in a folder window, or in Windows Explorer and choose Properties from the pop-up menu. When the Properties dialog box opens, click the Photoshop Image tab to look at your image, as shown in Figure 3-6. Again, you must have saved a thumbnail preview along with the image for this feature to work. You can also see a tiny thumbnail in the General panel of the Properties dialog box. This same thumbnail appears at the desktop level, assuming that the folder is set to View Large Icons. Using the other tabs in the Properties dialog box, you can view the caption, keywords, credits, and other information created using Photoshop's File File Info command (covered at the end of Chapter 2). Unfortunately, this trick works only for images saved in the native...

Editing in an application other than Elements or Photoshop

If you have an external image editor other than Elements or Photoshop, such as CorelPAINT, you can jump to that application from Album. All of the steps are identical except that when it comes to saving the file in the external image editor. Here are the steps to follow Choose EditOEdit with Editor (where Editor represents your designated image editor). The name that appears in the menu depends on what editor you chose in the Preferences dialog box (as described in Specifying an External Image Editor in Album earlier in this chapter). 5. Choose FileOSave in the external image editor.

Why Photoshop Integration is Important for Adobe Production Studio

Adobe's Photoshop is an application that changed the way we all think about image editing. Adobe Premiere was one of the first software-based video editing applications on the scene. It's only natural that they would be designed to work hand-in-hand. Converting and processing still images and graphics and creating graphic elements and masks for compositing will always be a critical part of creating video programs. Whether you're creating a video for deployment on tape, CD-ROM, or DVD, Photoshop is a critical accessory for high quality video production with Adobe Premiere. Adobe After Effects relies heavily upon integration with Adobe Photoshop. This integration is explored through several of this book's tutorials. Encore DVD uses Photoshop as the basis of its menu systems.

To save a file in TIFF format (Photoshop):

Byte Order Photoshop and most recent applications can read files using either byte order. However, if you don't know what kind of program the file may be opened in, select the platform on which the file will be read. Save Image Pyramid Preserves multiresolution information. Photoshop does not provide options for opening multiresolution files the image opens at the highest resolution within the file. However, Adobe InDesign and some image servers provide support for opening multiresolution formats. Save Transparency Preserves transparency as an additional alpha channel when the file is opened in another application. (Transparency is always preserved when the file is reopened in Photoshop or ImageReady.) Layer Compression Specifies a method for compressing data for pixels in layers (as opposed to composite data). Many applications cannot read layer data and will skip over it when opening a TIFF file. Photoshop, however, can read layer data in TIFF files. Although files that include...

Chapter 2. Camera and Lens Effects in Photoshop

Fortunately, you don't actually need a dozen lenses, a bag full of filters, or enough light sources to illuminate the Statue of Liberty to take great pictures. Many of you probably get along very well with nothing more than the zoom lens or electronic flash built into your camera. But whether you're a photo gadget freak or a photo gadget phobe, Photoshop has some tools you'll find extremely useful. Built into your favorite image editor are capabilities that let you duplicate many camera and lighting effects. Simulating traditional photographic techniques in Photoshop is useful for several reasons. First, even if you own every lens or piece of gear known to civilization you may not always have your prized gadget with you when you need it. For example, I've traveled to Europe carrying just one camera body, a 35mm and a 105mm lens. More recently, I've gone on trips with a digital camera, its built-in zoom lens, and a stack of memory cards as my sole still photography equipment. It's also...

Extracting objects from their background (Photoshop)

To extract an object, you use tools in the Extract dialog box. First you draw a highlight that marks the edges of the object, and define the object's interior. Then you can preview the extraction and redo it or touch up the result as needed. When you extract the object, Photoshop erases its background to transparency. Pixels on the edge of the object lose their color components derived from the background, so they can blend with a new background without producing a color halo. 9 You can add back opacity to the background and create other effects by using the Edit > Fade command after an extraction. (See Blending filter effects (Photoshop) on page 322.)

Painting with a state or snapshot of an image (Photoshop)

The history brush tool works similarly to the clone stamp tool, but on any state or snapshot of the image, not just the current one. (See Cloning and repairing images on page 188.) In Photoshop, you can also paint with the art history brush to create special effects. (See Using the art history brush tool (Photoshop) on page 226.)

Chapter 3. Darkroom Techniques with Photoshop CS2

Fortunately, there's no need to throw the spectacular images out with the stopbath water. Photoshop includes a whole raft of features that let you re-create the most useful darkroom techniques quickly and repeatedly, without risk of wasting film, paper, or chemicals. You can even manipulate your digital negatives using your digital camera's RAW format. This chapter will show you some of the advanced darkroom techniques that you can put to work using Photoshop's awesome capabilities.

Photoshop operations timing

If you select Timing, the preview box tells how long Photoshop took to perform the last operation (including background tasks, such as transferring an image to the system Clipboard). Adobe may have added this option to help testing facilities run their Photoshop tests. But built-in timing helps you as well.

Filters: The Fun Side of Photoshop

7he Photoshop CS2 Filter menu includes over 100 commands that you can use to fix, flatter, finesse, and freak out your photos. You can use most of the filters on most of your artwork and some of the filters on some of your artwork, and you probably won't ever use a number of the filters. tures in all of Photoshop the Filter Gallery and Liquify. Not only are they fun, but you can use them to do wondrous things to your artwork. I wrap up the chapter with a look at several other key filters.

Capture Images Larger than You Plan to Use in Photoshop

Whenever you import an image into Photoshop, regardless of whether you captured it from a digital camera or a scanner, it's important to assign an accurate file resolution, as discussed in the section File Resolution earlier in this chapter. The reason is that it is very difficult to increase a file's resolution at a later date and retain the same quality. In order to have that image print well in your company's brochure, you'd need a file resolution that is ideally closer to 300 dpi. So at this point, you have two options rescan the image (as long as you still have it ) at a higher resolution, or attempt to resample the image in Photoshop. Resampling is discussed in the next tip, Adjust an Image's Resolution in Photoshop.

Discovering Photoshop's Painting Tools

Nothing in Photoshop gives you more precise control of color in your image than using the Pencil tool with a 1-pixel brush. Remember that your image consists of a whole lot of little colored squares (pixels) and that the color of those individual squares is what produces the appearance of a tree or a sunset or even good ol' Uncle Bob. If you zoom in really close on an image, you can paint pixel by pixel you could even create an entire image, one pixel at a time As you work in Photoshop, however, you'll find many very important roles for the brush-using tools other than creating imagery. From touching up dust and scratches in a scan to removing distant power lines from a photo to perhaps adding wispy hairs to soften the outline of a head, you have lots of reasons to paint in Photoshop (many of which you can read about in Chapters 9 and 10). When you're capable and confident using the Brush tool, you might even find it the best way to make selections in your image. Selections with the...

# Choose Fileo SaveoFormato Photoshop.

Save your panorama in Photoshop (.psd) format before you do anything else. Be sure to include the layers by checking the Layers check box. This particular panorama is a 62-x-8.5-inch, 300ppi, 136MB image. You will need 500MB of RAM and 2GB of Scratch Disk every bit of that to manipulate this image in Photoshop.

What Photoshop Features Import?

The first Alpha channel is properly understood on import. Do not save more than one alpha channel with your native .PSD file or it will be ignored. Feel free to use all of Photoshop's features. If your file contains, Layers, Layer Sets, Layer Styles, Blending Modes, Vector Type, or Vector Shapes, Vegas will properly interpret them on import. The .psd files will be opened with all visible layers flattened. Alpha channel will be retained and can be enabled (with several interpretation options) in the Vegas media properties dialog.

Why does the world need another Photoshop book?

As a Photoshop neophyte in the early 1990s, I was always hungry for resource materials. I would scour the local bookstores looking to be informed and inspired. What I noticed then was that Photoshop books, more or less, fell into one of two categories. What you hold in your hands is the book I always wanted. My aim is to inspire you as well as inform you. I have spent a great deal of time perfecting a variety of artistic styles and working practices in Photoshop. And I have also spent a great deal of time producing images that I hope will inspire you to learn. This book is for those of you who not only appreciate art, but also want to know in explicit detail, how to create it on your own. There seems to be an infinite amount of Photoshop books out there, and many of them are excellent. However, I still haven't found that perfect book that inspires as much as it instructs. After all these years I came to the conclusion that the book I was after didn't exist, so I decided to write it...

Placing Photoshop Images in Other Programs

Either your Photoshop images will be standalone works of art, or they will be incorporated into some other kind of project. Perhaps you edit a newsletter, or you do Flash movies or PowerPoint presentations. Maybe you've done a pile of product shots to go into a catalog. The question is, how do you move them from Photoshop into some other application It's not difficult. The other programs do the importing. You simply need to save your images in a compatible format, and in a folder that you can easily keep track of. Using Photoshop with PowerPoint Placing Photoshop Images in Other Programs 479

Recognizing nonprintable colors (Photoshop)

Some colors in the RGB, HSB, and Lab color models, such as neon colors, cannot be printed because they have no equivalents in the CMYK model. When you select a nonprintable color, an alert triangle appears in the Color Picker dialog box and in the Color palette. The closest CMYK equivalent is displayed below the triangle. (See Identifying out-of-gamut colors (Photoshop) on page 136.)

Transforming perspective while cropping (Photoshop)

The crop tool in Photoshop has an additional option that allows you to transform the perspective in an image. This is very useful when working with images that contain keystone distortion. Keystone distortion occurs when an object is photographed from an angle rather than from a straight-on view. For example, if you take a picture of a a tall building from ground level, the edges of the building appear closer at the top than they do at the bottom.

Determining a recommended resolution for an image (Photoshop)

If you plan to print your image using a halftone screen, the range of suitable image resolutions depends on the screen frequency of your output device. You can have Photoshop determine a recommended resolution for your image based on your device's screen frequency. (See About image size and resolution on page 62.)

Jumping to other applications (Image Ready)

In addition to jumping to current versions of Photoshop, you can jump to other graphics-editing applications and HTML-editing applications from within ImageReady. When you install ImageReady, Adobe graphics-editing and HTML-editing applications currently on your system are added to the Jump To submenu. You can add more applications, including non-Adobe applications, to the Jump To submenu. When you jump to a graphics-editing application, the original file is opened in the destination application. When you jump to an HTML editor, the optimized file and the HTML file are saved and opened in the destination application. If the image contains slices, all files for the full image are included. A preference enables files updated in another application to be automatically updated in ImageReady, when jumping back to ImageReady.

To save a file in Photoshop EPS format:

1 Save the artwork, and choose Photoshop EPS from the Format menu. (See Saving files on page 446.) Binary produces a smaller file and leaves the original data intact. Choose Binary encoding if you're printing from a Mac OS system. However, some page-layout applications and some commercial print spooling and network printing software may not support binary Photoshop EPS files.

Use Photoshop Mockups as Tracing Images When Building Pages in GoLive

If you designed a detailed mockup in Photoshop containing significant portions that are not comprised of graphics, such as the one that includes form elements or large areas of text, it can be particularly useful to have a copy of that mockup in sight when building the code for the web page. GoLive has a feature that not only allows you to have that mockup in sight while you're building the code but also gives you the opportunity to cut out portions of that mockup and optimize them as web graphics without having to open Photoshop. TRY IT To use a Photoshop file as a tracing image when building a web page layout in GoLive, open the file you want to work with in GoLive or choose File I New Page to create a new web page layout. Then, select Window I Tracing Image to display the Tracing Image palette. TRY IT To cut out an element from the tracing image and optimize it as a web graphic on the web page, select the Cut Out tool (shaped like Photoshop's Crop tool) in the Tracing Image palette...

Modifying layer effects with contours (Photoshop)

You can use contours to shape the appearance of an effect over a given range in the Drop Shadow, Inner Shadow, Inner Glow, Outer Glow, Bevel and Emboss, and Satin effects when creating custom layer styles. For example, a Linear contour on a Drop Shadow causes the opacity to drop off in a linear transition while a Custom contour can be used to create a unique shadow transition. Custom contours created in Photoshop can be used in ImageReady. You can select, reset, delete, or change the preview of contours in the contour pop-up palette and Preset Manager. For more information, see Using pop-up palettes on page 31 and Managing libraries with the Preset Manager (Photoshop) on page 54.

Now let's look at how useful Gradients can be when working creatively in Photoshop

There are technical explanations for each of the Blending modes in your Photoshop Manual or online guide. It's worth going through these to understand exactly what's going on. E Gradients are great for those working with digital or scanned photographic images in Photoshop.We can use gradients in place of traditional photographic filters to create some cool effects.Here's the original unfiltered image.

Creating temporary masks in Quick Mask mode (Photoshop)

Quick Mask mode lets you edit any selection as a mask without using the Channels palette and while viewing your image. The advantage of editing your selection as a mask is that you can use almost any Photoshop tool or filter to modify the mask. For example, if you create a rectangular selection with the marquee tool, you can enter Quick Mask mode and use the paintbrush to extend or contract the selection, or you can use a filter to distort the edges of the selection. You can also use selection tools, because the quick mask is not a selection.

Color gamuts (Photoshop)

Among the color models used in Photoshop, L*a*b has the largest gamut, encompassing all colors in the RGB and CMYK gamuts. Typically, RGB gamuts contain the subset of these colors that can be viewed on a computer or television monitor (which emits red, green, and blue light). Therefore, some colors, such as pure cyan or pure yellow, can't be displayed accurately on a monitor. CMYK gamuts are smaller, consisting only of colors that can be printed using process-color inks. When colors that cannot be printed are displayed on-screen, they are referred to as out-of-gamut colors that is, outside a CMYK gamut. (See Identifying out-of-gamut colors (Photoshop) on page 136.)

Controlling optimization (Image Ready)

By default, Photoshop and ImageReady automatically regenerate the optimized image when you click the Optimized, 2-Up, or 4-Up tab at the top of the document (if you have modified the image since the last optimization), when you change optimization settings with the optimized image displayed, or when you edit the original image. In ImageReady, you can turn off auto-regeneration so that the last version of the optimized image remains in the image window until you manually reoptimize the image or reactivate auto-regeneration. This feature is useful if you want to edit the image without pausing for reoptimization with each modification. You can also cancel optimization while it's in progress, and preserve the previous image.

When Good Programs Go Bad: Fixing Photoshop

Tools don't work right. Simple commands take ages to execute. Photoshop (gasp ) crashes Don't give up, and please don't toss the machine through the window. (Hey, I might be walking past at the time.) Start with the easy fixes and work your way up as necessary. l Check the palettes and selection. If a tool isn't working as expected or is not working at all, check whether you're inadvertently preventing it from doing its job. See whether you have an active selection elsewhere in the image or press +D Ctrl+D to deselect. Look at the Layers palette Are you on the correct layer Is the layer itself active or a layer mask Check the Channels palette Are the color channels active At the left end of the Options bar, right-click (multibutton mouse) or Control-click (single-button mouse) the tool icon and select Reset Tool. Open another image a flattened 8-bit RGB image and try the tool or technique in that image. (If it works there, the problem isn't...

Part IV: Power Photoshop

The two chapters in Part IV are more specialized than the rest of the book. If you don't work in a production environment (even cropping to the same dimensions regularly can count as production), you might not need to use Actions in Photoshop. But there's far more to Chapter 16 than just Actions and scripting It also shows you how you can create an onscreen presentation that anyone can view, automatically generate a single page with small thumbnail images of all your photos, and save paper by printing multiple images on a single sheet. Chapter 17 is a Web-only chapter. If you don't create graphics for the Web, you probably don't need to read it. However, if you skip it, you might never see how to create cool little animated movies.

Setting file saving options (Photoshop)

Thumbnail (Windows) Saves thumbnail data for the file. In order to select or deselect this option, you must choose Ask When Saving for the Image Previews option in the Preferences dialog box. For more information, see Setting preferences for saving files (Photoshop) on page 463.

Photoshop has several gadgets to help you work with various views of your document

The main interface in Photoshop is quite simple and well laid-out, but it has been constantly refined through development to offer highly efficient document and view management. Within the main menu is the View menu which has many view management options -the Zoom In and Out commands and their respective shortcuts, as well as commands to show the Rulers, Guides and Grids and the option to enable various kinds of snapping. As well as using the Navigator or Zoom tool you can use the shortcuts

Brushes offer some of Photoshop's most flexible features. So where can you find them?

The Brush tool can be found in the fourth row of Photoshop's toolbar. When selected, the options bar displays quite a few settings for the current Brush such as Opacity, Flow and whether it is in Airbrush mode or not. There are also pulldown menus for the Apply mode, Brush Shape preset and the new Brush Editing palette.

Photoshop CS Mastery

Photoshop CS Mastery

Artists, photographers, graphic artists and designers. In fact anyone needing a top-notch solution for picture management and editing. Set Your Photographic Creativity Free. Master Adobe Photoshop Once and For All - Create Flawless, Dramatic Images Using The Tools The Professionals Choose. Get My Video Tutorials and Retain More Information About Adobe Photoshop.

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