Linear Burn

Like many of the Darken group of blending modes, Linear Burn also inspects each channel on the base and blend layers. It darkens the base color to reflect the blend color by decreasing the brightness. Because its neutral color is white, highlights in a Linear Burn blend layer have no effect on the underlying image.

Linear Burn is similar to Color Burn in that both darken the base color to reflect the blend, so the effect Linear Burn creates depends on which color is on top. The difference is that, while Color Burn works by increasing the contrast, Linear Burn decreases the brightness.

Linear Burn is also

The best way to appreciate Linear Burn is by comparison with the other members of the Darken group of blending modes

Duplicate an image layer (Ctrl/Cmd-J), and set the new layer's blending mode to Linear Burn The resulting image is much darker and appears more saturated Now use Alt/Opt-Shift-Minus to cycle back through the other Darken blending modes, and Alt/Opt-Shift-Plus to cycle forward

A simple Linear Burn self-blend is enough to make a noticeable darkening of the image—unlike the Darken blend mode, which has no effect on a self-blend Compared with Multiply, Linear Blur produces a much harsher result and is uniformly darker Lastly, it always darkens the picture more than Color Burn Think of Linear Burn as the darkest and harshest of the Darken modes

A Linear Burn self-blend produces a darker, harsher result than Color Burn or Multiply.

With Color Burn, the sky in the horizon image.

KEYBOARD SHORTCUT

Windows: Alt+Shift+A Mac: Option+Shift+A

similar to Multiply in that the blend layer lets the base color show through; however, Linear Burn darkens the base color and produces more blacks.

KEYBOARD SHORTCUT

Windows: Alt+Shift+A Mac: Option+Shift+A

Multiply self-blends produce a softer result than Linear Burn.

With a Darken self-blend, there is no discernible difference.

The effect of opacity

Changing the layer and fill opacity isn't the same thing While the Layer Opacity slider affects any layer styles and blending modes applied to the layer, the Fill Opacity slider doesn't change any layer effects that may have been applied So, in the case of Linear Burn, reducing the layer opacity makes the result much more like the original, but softer and brighter However, if the fill opacity is reduced to the same percentage, the image looks much more like a typical Linear Burn layer

Reducing the layer opacity produces a softer, brighter result than reducing the fill opacity percentage.

| Layers Channels

EaibSiNi

0

Linear Burn "

Opacity:

100%. >

Lock: □ J ^ a

Fill:

30% ►

m ft | Fin opacity

1® Backgrouna

a

oi

, -I SJ

_

Multiply self-blends produce a softer result than Linear Burn.

With a Darken self-blend, there is no discernible difference.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment