Vivid Light and Linear Light

Original image.

Uivid Light and Linear Light are two very similar blending modes, which is why I've chosen to include them here together. They are both contrast-increasing modes, but Vivid Light combines the effects of Color Burn and Color Dodge, while Linear Light combines the effects of Linear Burn and Linear Dodge.

KEYBOARD SHORTCUT

Windows: Alt+Shift+V Mac: Option+Shift+V

Vivid Light is a contrast-increasing blending mode that combines the effects of Color Burn and Color Dodge If the blend color is darker than mid-gray, Vivid Light darkens or burns the image by increasing the contrast Otherwise, the image is lightened or dodged by decreasing the contrast

Self-blends

A simple Vivid Light self-blend isn't that useful—the result is a high-contrast image But one curiosity of the contrast-increasing blending modes is that they can produce interesting halos when inverted and combined with some Gaussian blur At the image edges, the blur bleeds one image area's tonal values into its neighbor, and the blending mode can then produce some strange tonal reversals

Layers Ihannels Paths W®

Vivid Light

Opacity:

100% >

Lock: □ J * Q

Fill:

100% >

®

/

Vivid Light

®

a

Background

a

L_

■s® -Q]

a a s

Layers Channels I Paths

Vivid Light

V

Opacity:

100%

Lock: □ J tj+ £i Fill:

100%

Inverted + blur 4

Background

Original image.

A Vivid Light self-blend produces high-contrast output and clips both shadows and highlights.

With an inverted Vivid Light self-blend, a Gaussian blur radius of 4 produces an embossed effect, while a radius of 60 produces strange shadow tone reversals.

Linear Light

Using Linear Light

Linear Light is another strong contrast-increasing mode Where Linear Light differs from Vivid Light is that Linear Light is a combination of Linear Burn and Linear Dodge, and adjusts brightness rather than contrast If the blend layer color is darker than mid-gray, Linear Light darkens the image by decreasing its brightness Blend colors lighter than mid-gray result in a brighter image due to increased brightness Blending with mid-gray doesn't change the image

Fact File

KEYBOARD SHORTCUT

Windows: Alt+Shift+J Mac Option+Shift+J

J Navigator ^ Info ^ Histogram

Source:

Mean:

Entire Image

59.30 StdDev: 89.71 Median: 0 Pixels: 310460

Channel:

RGB

A

Level: Count: Percentile: Cache Level: 2

With an inverted Vivid Light self-blend, a Gaussian blur radius of 4 produces an embossed effect, while a radius of 60 produces strange shadow tone reversals.

J Navigator \ Info ' Histogram Channel:

Don't forget the histogram's expanded view. With these self-blends, Vivid Light's mean or average brightness value is 60.57—slightly brighter than the 59.30 produced by Linear Light.

Source: Entire Image

Mean: 60.57 StdDev: 88.52 Median: 0 Pixels: 310460

Level: Count: Percentile: Cache Level: 2

11 iere's not much to add to using Linear Light that hasn't already been mentioned for Vivid Light Again, inverting the blend layer arid adding some Gaussian blur can produce some interesting effects

Linear Light produces a higher-contrast image than Hard Light or Overlay.

1 Layers * Channels H.Paths

Normal

Opacity:

100% >

Lock: □ J * fi

Fill:

100% ►

Lt

®

Background

a

®® o\

_i a]

a

G

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment