Water Droplets

t's easy to add the effect of water droplets. You don't need to sandwich your original with a stock photograph of droplets. Instead, make some water droplets of your own, and add steam or mist to simulate looking through a window or into a mirror.

1 In the Layers palette, duplicate the original layer by dragging the background layer onto the "Create a new layer" icon, or use Ctrl/Cmd-J

2 Add a new layer using either the "Create a new layer" icon or the shortcut Ctrl/Cmd-Shift-N and name "Droplets "

3 Hit the D key to reset the foreground and background colors, press the X key to switch the foreground and background colors, then hit Alt/Option-Backspace to fill the new layer with white.

4 Set the Droplets layer's blending mode to Hard Light using the pull-down blending mode menu in the Layers palette or the shortcut Alt/Opt-Shift-H

5 Using Filter > Noise > Add Noise, add noise to the Droplets layer Use Gaussian Noise with a value of 200, and check monochromatic check box

6 With the Droplets layer active, apply blur using Filter Blur > Gaussian Blur

The Radius value needn't be greater than 5

7 Select Image > Adjustments > Threshold and drag the slider to the right—the dots grow larger.

8 Repeat steps 4 and 5 Keep the droplets below 50% of the total image

9 Check the foreground color is still white, then choose Select > Color Range; with the default settings, the white pixels should automatically be selected Click OK

10 Hit Delete (Backspace), and the layer should only consist of water droplets

11 Invert the selection using Ctrl/Cmd-Shift-I

12 Set the foreground color to a light gray and use Alt/Opt-Backspace to fill the droplets with it

13 In the Layers palette, click the "Add a layer style" icon and select Bevel and Emboss

14 Also in the Layer Styles dialog box, doubleclick Stroke and add a darker gray stroke, with its size set to 1 pixel and the Opacity at around 50% Click OK

15 In the Layers palette, duplicate the background layer using Ctrl/Cmd-J Change this new layer's blending mode to Screen and name this layer "Screen" or "Steam."

16 With the Screen layer active, use Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur, and set a radius of 150

17 Adjust the Screen layer's opacity and consider masking or blurring it

Textured glass effect

Here, I used a mask on the Steam layer so the mistiness was higher toward the top (See page 82 for creating masks )

Altered landscape

A clipping mask is used so that the top Hue/Saturation adjustment layer only colors the raindrops The mask is created when you hold down Alt/Opt and click the line between the two layers—you'll notice that the cursor briefly chanpes shane

A clipping mask is used so that the top Hue/Saturation adjustment layer only colors the raindrops The mask is created when you hold down Alt/Opt and click the line between the two layers—you'll notice that the cursor briefly chanpes shane

Original image.

Original image.

Hue/Saturation - blue

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Blurred steam effect

Textured vignette effect

High-contrast images

To keep the girl's face sharp, I added a mask to the blurred Again, a mask is used on the center of this picture There is This recipe isn't just suitable only for low-contrast, muted steam layer, and the droplets were deleted manually around also a little vignetting because of the use of a Screen blending images Here, I also used a mask to reduce the blurring of her mouth and eyes mode, which lightened the edges of the image the balloons

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Lens Flare

Original image.

Lens flare is usually something you try to avoid, but it can create atmosphere in a photo. It's easy to add flare in Photoshop, but there are good and bad ways to do it. The lazy way is to apply the Lens Flare filter to the image—at worst, you might even overwrite the original image. Alternatively, add flare to a copy of the original layer, but this is less convenient if you want to edit the image or apply adjustments—your changes will affect both the image and the lens flare. The solution is to create the lens flare on its own layer and use blending modes to fine-tune the result.

It's always worth checking what authentic lens flare looks like. I shot this with a 14mm lens.

1 In the Layers palette, double-click the background layer and name the layer "Original."

2 Co to Image > Canvas Size Make the canvas at least double the original image size This step is included to allow you to reposition the flare layer afterward, so you don't need to be too precise

3 Co to either Layer > New > Layer (Ctrl/Cmd-Shift-N) or else click on the "Create a new layer" icon in the Layers palette to create a new layer. Name the layer "Flare "

4 Using the pull-down blending mode menu in the Layers palette or the shortcut Alt/Opt-Shift-H, set the Flare layer's blending mode to

Hard Light

5 Co to Edit > Fill, and, in the Fill dialog box, select 50% Cray in the Contents drop-down menu and Overlay in the Blending

It's always worth checking what authentic lens flare looks like. I shot this with a 14mm lens.

pull-down menu Then click OK

6 With the Flare layer active, select Filter > Render > Lens Flare and add the flare

7 If the flare is in the wrong place, select the Move tool (M) and move the Flare layer This is where steps r and 2 become useful—without them, moving the Flare layer would show the layer's edges.

8 You can also use Edit > Transform to resize the Flare—just remember to hold down the Shift key as you drag the layer's corners to retain the correct proportions

9 Finally, if necessary, crop the new image back to the borders of the original image In the Layers palette, Ctrl/ Cmd-Click the Original layer and then use Image > Crop

Original image.

ID

Background

Q Hard Light 100

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A Hard Light blending mode produces the most natural effect Using Linear Light as the blending mode resulted in an image that looked as if it included the sun

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After adding the flare, I repositioned the brightest spot directly over a highlight on the nearest balloon

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Adding lens flare

The Screen blending mode is often best at replicating how flare can produce washed-out, low-contrast results

Adding atmosphere

This contre-jour image (whereby the photographer shoots into the light) already contained lens flare I duplicated the Photoshop Flare layer to intensify the atmosphere it lent the image

Emphasizing lens flare

This is another contre-jour image that was already slightly spoiled by true lens flare I needed to duplicate the Photoshop Flare layer to strengthen its effect

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Original image.

Original image.

Original image.
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Responses

  • kgaugelo
    This is the best hey it helped me a lot wit photoshop CS5 hey I love to say thank you
    5 years ago

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