Hard Mix sharpening

In this picture I used a low Gaussian Blur value, which is why the windows' shapes are clearly visible, but the more subtly toned reflections are colorized by the Hard Mix blending layer

Notice too how the blue sky is dotted with odd pixels of color This happens in areas of even tone where individual pixels differ slightly from their neighbors and where the Hard Mix algorithm forces them to assume a completely different color

Try varying a Hard Mix layer's opacity, because even small percentage changes have a big effect Here, you can see that the edges of the glass windows are white and so stand out strongly It's almost a sharpening effect, though the result is still deliberately unnatural But at a very low opacity, as low as 5-10%, Hard Mix can be used to deliberately sharpen a picture

With an image that contains lots of detail, such as the one shown here, this recipe won't produce the same dramatic woodworm effect that is obvious in the picture of the knight Instead, it will sharpen the image The picture remains natural-looking if the Hard Mix layer's opacity is set to a low percentage Here, percentages above 50% sharpen the image Notice the halos around the stones—you can also see this in some of the pictures of the buildings

Pin Light + inverted + blur

Hard Mix + inverted

Background

.ayers Ahame!; Paths

Hard Mix

Pin Light + inverted + blur

Hard Miw + inverted + blur

Background

blurred+ inverted

Hard Mix + blurred+ inverted

B 100

B 100

C 10 C 100

Pin Light + blurred+ inverted

Hard Mix + blurred+ inverted

B 100

B 100

C 92

Pin Light + blui ied+ inverted

Hard Mix + blui ied+ inverted

B 100

B 100

C 30

C 85

0 0

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