Figure 5.45

Draw a 1-pixeI-wide transition line here.

2. Create a new layer called Carpet and make it gray in the New Layer dialog box. Use the Paint Bucket and click a point inside the small room below the new transition line to fill this room with black.

3. Apply a Pattern Overlay effect to the Carpet layer. In the Layer Style dialog box, open the Pattern Picker and select the BlueCarpet pattern. Close the Pattern Picker, set the Scale slider to 50%, and click OK.

4. Before you can create the remaining floor pattern, you have to temporarily turn off any effects that interfere with the boundary. In the Layers palette, toggle off the Drop Shadow effect belonging to the Kitchen-A-mlwk-ilnd layer.

Let's add the tile floor using another Pattern Overlay effect. In this case, we can cover two boundaries using one layer, registering the tile grid with an object in the kitchen.

5. Create a new layer called Ceramic Tile and make it gray in the New Layer dialog box. Use the Paint Bucket and click the floor space in the middle of the kitchen to fill it with black. Notice the small white space at the bottom of the plan; click inside this space to fill it with black also.

NOTE Although it might not be realistic for the kitchen tile to extend into a separate room, notice how two non-contiguous areas can be filled with the same pattern on one layer.

6. Apply a Pattern Overlay effect to the Ceramic Tile layer. In the Layer Style dialog box, select the CeramicTile pattern from the Pattern Picker. Set the Scale slider to 38%. While you have the Layer Style dialog box open, bring your mouse over the document window; notice that it appears with the Move cursor. Drag the pattern so that the tile grid registers with the corner of the bar counter, as shown in Figure 5.46. Click OK in the Layer Style dialog box.

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