Simulating Texture

Perhaps the most important transformation made to a line drawing in Photoshop is simulating texture, because it gives the image realistic-looking surfaces. Let's start by filling areas with flat color and then texturize them by filtering with visual noise. In addition, you can add scans or photos of real materials to your pattern library and then apply them to the elevation. Later in this section you will learn how to cut reveals (gaps) into the stonework, patterning a surface with proportional lines.

1. If you have Elevation.psd open from the previous exercise, you can continue here; if not, open that file from the Chapter 6 folder on the companion CD before continuing.

The Swatches palette can be a great aid if your project calls for a specific color scheme because you can see all the colors you'll be using for quick visual reference. Rather than try to remember the specific HSB or RGB values for particular colors, you can save them as swatches and sample them throughout the project. You will add two such swatches representing the major field and accent colors of cut stone used on the building facade.

2. Click the foreground color swatch in the toolbox to open the Color Picker. Set the HSB values to 40,40,90, and click OK to close the Color Picker. Position your mouse over a blank portion of the Swatches palette (at the bottom), and notice that your cursor changes to a Paint Bucket. Click to add a new swatch; type Field Stone into the Color Swatch Name dialog box and click OK. A new swatch is added at the bottom of the palette.

TIP You can save custom swatch libraries on the hard drive as .aco files, share them with others, and reuse them in multiple projects. Use the Swatches palette menu to manage these files.

3. Click the foreground color swatch in the toolbox to again open the Color Picker. Set the HSB values to 35,25,100, and click OK to close the Color Picker. Click again inside a blank portion of the Swatches palette to add another swatch. Type the name Accent Stone and click OK to close the Color Swatch Name dialog box.

Because all your line work resides on a single layer, you'll want to preserve this layer and not add any fill or layer style effects to it. You will need to create a new layer for each texture you will be applying.

4. Select the Linework layer at the top of the Layers palette, and then press Shift+Ctrl+N. Type Field Stone in the New Layer dialog box, make the layer Red, and click OK.

5. Click the Field Stone color swatch in the Swatches palette. Select the Paint Bucket tool from the toolbox (it may be hidden under the Gradient tool). On the Options bar, set the Fill drop-down to Foreground, set Tolerance to 1, uncheck Anti-aliased, check Contiguous, and check Use All Layers.

NOTE You'll use these same settings for the Paint Bucket throughout this chapter unless otherwise noted.

6. Fill the fieldstone flat color into appropriate locations in the elevation: Using the Paint Bucket, click inside each boundary to fill the locations shown in Figure 6.5 with the fieldstone color.

Figure 6.5

Fill flat color into the fieldstone boundaries (the darker areas of this image).

Figure 6.5

Fill flat color into the fieldstone boundaries (the darker areas of this image).

7. You can texturize the fill added in the last step because it's on a separate layer. Adding visual noise is a great way to simulate texture: Choose Filter > Noise > Add Noise to open the Add Noise dialog box. Set Amount to 10% and click the Gaussian radio button (for more variety). Check Monochromatic so that the noise affects intensity but not hue and click OK. The solid color has become stone!

You will create a more realistic texture with the pattern overlay effect (see Chapter 5). However, before applying it, let's open a scan of a real piece of granite and add it to the pattern library.

8. Open the file Granite.jpg (see Figure 6.6) from the companion CD. This tilable image is in grayscale.

9. With the Paint Bucket tool selected, change the Fill drop-down list box to Pattern on the Options bar. Open the Pattern Picker and click the triangle button to open the Pattern menu; select My Patterns to load your custom library. Click OK to the message "Replace current patterns with the patterns from My Patterns.pat?"

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Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Adobe Photoshop can be a complex tool only because you can do so much with it, however for in this video series, we're going to keep it as simple as possible. In fact, in this video you'll see an overview of the few tools and Adobe Photoshop features we will use. When you see this video, you'll see how you can do so much with so few features, but you'll learn how to use them in depth in the future videos.

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