254 Part V:The Part of Tens

3. Click the Monochrome check box.

Clicking the Monochrome check box immediately converts your image to black and white. Figure 13-2 shows the Monochrome check box.

4. Make moderate adjustments to the Red, Green, and Blue channels in the Channel Mixer dialog box.

You don't need to move the Red, Green, or Blue sliders much. Most of the time, you'll want to adjust the Red channel slightly to get the B&W effect you want.

Figure 13-2: Creating a Channel adjustment layer.

Mixer

Figure 13-2: Creating a Channel adjustment layer.

Mixer

Experiment by moving each slider — Red, Green, and Blue — and you'll probably find that only slight (or even no) adjustment does the trick. Figure 13-3 shows the image converted using the Channel Mixer.

1-3: Converted image to B&W using the Channel Mixer.

To increase or decrease contrast in the image after you convert it to black and white, create a Curves adjustment layer that you can use to increase or decrease the contrast in your image to your liking.

Desaturating color using Hue/Saturation

Another way to convert color images to B&W involves Hue/Saturation adjustment. I like to use this method to desaturate yellows, greens, blues, cyans, and magentas in a color image. Then I use the Red Saturation control to add a little selenium-toned (you know those black-and-white photos with that brownish toning to them) look to my B&W converted photo. Here's the drill:

1. Open a photo you want to convert to B&W.

As in the first method, make sure you've made your tonal and color corrections before proceeding. (I cover those corrections in Chapter 10.)

2. Create a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer.

Figure 13-4 shows creating a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer by clicking the Create a New Fill or Adjustment Layer button and then choosing Hue/Saturation from the resulting menu.

3. Desaturate colors, starting with yellow:

a. Click the Edit menu, and select Yellows (Ctrl+2 [Windows] or ^+2 [Mac]).

b. In the Saturation control, move the Saturation slider all the way to the left to a setting of -100 to remove Figure 13-4: Creating a Hue/Saturation the yellow color. adjustment layer.

c. Repeat this step for each of the other colors: greens, cyans, blues, and magentas. (You adjust the reds in the next step.)

4. Desaturate the Red channel.

Move the slider all the way to the left to a setting of -100. Move the slider back to the left slightly until you obtain a toned effect. A setting of -70 to -40 usually gives me the toned effect I like in some of my B&W conversions. The photo, when converted to B&W as shown in Figure 13-5, is slightly toned with a Red-channel Saturation setting of -40.

256 Part V:The Part of Tens

Color image Converted to B&W using Hue/Saturation

Figure 13-5: Converted image using the Hue/Saturation adjustment to add tone.

Color image Converted to B&W using Hue/Saturation

Figure 13-5: Converted image using the Hue/Saturation adjustment to add tone.

Selective Color

You may have seen photos and film of B&W scenes where only a portion of the frame is in color. In Photoshop, that's a fairly easy effect to accomplish. I've added a few of these photos to my portfolio, and it adds a nice surprise for someone viewing my work on the Web or in a collection of prints.

My technique is simple — it's almost the same as the previous technique that converts color to B&W, except I save a selection in which color will remain. The process that achieves this selective color follows:

1. Open a photo you want to convert to B&W while retaining an object with color.

As in the first method, make sure you've made your tonal and color corrections (see Chapter 10) before proceeding.

2. Create a new layer you can use to make selections:

a. Create a new layer by pressing Shift+Ctrl+Alt+E (Shift+^+Option+E on a Mac).

b. Name this new layer selections.

3. Select a part of the image to remain in color.

Using the selection techniques covered in Chapter 11, select an area of the image where you want color to remain. Figure 13-6 shows a zoomed portion of my image with an area selected; here I'm using the Magic Wand tool to select areas I want to retain their colors.

Figure 13-6: Making selections using the Magic Wand tool.

As you use the Magic Wand, experiment with different Tolerance settings. (You can find the Tolerance setting in the Option bar shown in Figure 13-6.) For like colors, I'd use a lower setting (such as 20), but for colors like those of the leaves in my example, I have to select a broader range of colors — so here I change the Tolerance setting to 40. This higher setting allows me to select more of the image with each click of the Magic Wand.

4. Duplicate the layer.

Right-click (Ctrl+click on a Mac) on the active layer and choose Duplicate layer. Name the new layer Convert to B&W.

5. Inverse the selection.

Because I want to keep the color in the selected leaves, I choose SelectO Inverse, or Shift+Ctrl+I (Shift+^+I on a Mac), which inverses the selection so the rest of the image (and not the leaves) gets converted to B&W.

6. Desaturate color.

Choose ImageOAdjustmentsOHue/Saturation, or press Ctrl+U (^+U on a Mac). As in the B&W conversion technique covered in the "Desaturating color using Hue/Saturation" section (earlier in this chapter), you desatu-rate reds, greens, and blues by clicking the yellows, greens, blues, cyans, and magentas, and moving the Saturation slider for each color all the way to the left to desaturate it.

Slide those reds only as far to the left as it takes to give you the slightly toned effect. If you don't want a toned effect in your image, you can slide the reds all the way to the left to a setting of -100.

7. Adjust contrast by using the Curves adjustment.

I often find that my B&W conversions need a touch of contrast added. Use the Curves adjustment to add or reduce contrast in the B&W areas of the image to your personal taste.

Figure 13-7 shows the original color image, compared to the same image converted to B&W with selective colors remaining.

Converted to B&W with selective color

Converted to B&W with selective color

Color image

Figure 13-7: Original color image and the converted image with selective color.

Color image

Figure 13-7: Original color image and the converted image with selective color.

Creating a Cool Blurring Effect

Often I'll shoot a series of photos of a subject, and use the best one as my final working image. Other photos in the series may be good, but I've already picked the best one. When I'm bored, and there's nothing on TV like football, The Three Stooges, any show with monkeys in it, or The Simpsons, I'll fire up the computer, start Bridge, and cruise for photos to have fun with.

One technique I like to use on these "lost treasures" is a selective blur effect. I'll apply a blur to the image, create a layer mask, then selectively paint in the parts of the image I want blurred.

Here's the procedure that creates the blurring effect:

1. Open a photo you want to convert and apply the blur effects to.

Make sure you've made your tonal and color corrections HlJl ) (discussed in Chapter 10) before proceeding.

2. Create a new layer to use to apply the blur by pressing Shift+Ctrl+Alt+E (Shift+^+ Option+E on a Mac) and then name the layer gaussian blur, as in the Layers palette shown in Figure 13-8.

3. Choose the Gaussian Blur filter by choosing FilterOBlurO Gaussian Blur.

Figure 13-8: Layers palette with a new layer created for editing.

The Gaussian Blur filter window appears, as shown in Figure 13-9. This is the filter you use to apply the blur to the entire image. Don't worry — the next few steps show you how to bring back the sharp parts of the image you want to retain.

Figure 13-8: Layers palette with a new layer created for editing.

Figure 13-9: The Gaussian Blur window.
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