Correcting Perspective

Although you can use the Crop tool in Perspective mode to correct keystoning, it usually distorts the image, so then that needs to be corrected. Here's another method that takes some of the guesswork out of applying the second transform:

1. Make sure that your image is not on a Background layer. If it is, double-click it to change it into a normal layer.

2. Drag in some vertical guides from the Ruler (R) so that you have something with which to align the verticals in your image.

3. Select the Move tool and then press Ctrl+T (Windows), (Mac OS) to invoke the Free Transform command.

4. When you see the bounding box, hold down Ctrl+Shift (Windows), ^+Shift (Mac OS) and drag one of the top corner handles outward until a vertical aligns with a guide (Figure 11-14). Do the same to the other corner if the keystoning is severe.

5. To apply the icing on the cake, while the transform is still active, click the link button between the width and height fields on the options bar. This action forces the height to constrain to the same distortion percentage as that applied to the width.

6. Commit the transform by pressing Enter (Windows), Return (Mac OS).

Figure 11-14: A—Original with heavy keystoning. B—Free Transform used to correct keystoning.

Figure 11-14: A—Original with heavy keystoning. B—Free Transform used to correct keystoning.

Using the preceding method, you won't have to guess just how much you need to stretch the image height-wise to restore the original proportions.

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