Making Over Contrast in an Image (continued)

0 Click the horizontal gradient bar (located under the graph) until the highlight end is on the right side.

! Click the quarter-tone area of the curve and drag it up one to two horizontal lines. Similarly, click and drag the three-quarter-tone position on the curve down one to two horizontal lines.

The quarter-tone position on the curve is — you guessed it — a quarter of the way across the grid; you can find the three-quarter-tone area at three quarters of the way.

@ Click OK to apply this curve adjustment.

Note how the contrast of the image has increased again, in response to applying the "S-shaped" curve adjustment.

Note how the contrast of the image has increased again, in response to applying the "S-shaped" curve adjustment.

Photoshop Confidential

Curve Shapes wJLml

The shape of a curve when you apply it to an image can dramatically affect the contrast of an image. Wherever a curve has a steep slope (as it is in the mid-tone in the preceding exercise), contrast is enhanced. More grayscale data is moved to the quarter-tone and three-quarter-tone areas of the image, thereby increasing the image's overall contrast. If a curve is flattened in the midtone (as in the following exercise), grayscale data are concentrated in the midtone aera of the image, which reduces contrast for the overall image. So the rule is: Steepening the curve increases contrast; flattening the curve decreases contrast.

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