Controls.

This document is created with trial version of CHM2PDF Pilot 2.16.100.

[View full size image]

This document is created with trial version of CHM2PDF Pilot 2.16.100.

[View full size image]

3. Change the Density slider to a value of 9, Foreground Level to 22, and Background Level to 22 (although you're free to experiment with different settings).

4. Click on OK to apply the filter. You'll find that the texture looks very much like real reticulation. If you'd like to see reticulation in color, you need to merge this reticulated black-and-white version with the original color image in the layer below.

5. To create a color reticulation, make sure the black-and-white reticulated layer is selected in the Layers Palette, then choose Color Dodge from the drop-down layer modes list at the left side of the palette, as shown in Figure 3.14. This merging mode allows the color of the underlying layer to show through, while retaining the reticulated texture of the layer on top.

Figure 3.14. Use Color Dodge to merge the black-and-white reticulated image with the color image in the layer below.

Figure 3.14. Use Color Dodge to merge the black-and-white reticulated image with the color image in the layer below.

W!

■L^r^:

Ci*¥ Doage *

!±J

[ iHt- u j * a f>

)0C« V-

^ ftii'mit-Hnl IftTiii"

* itidloruTd1

a

V J f. ^

| |

6. Merge the two layers (Layer > Merge Layers or Ctrl/Command + E) to produce the finished image.

Weird color effects, like those produced with cross-processing, are often used because they produce unusual and unique looks, until eventually the point is reached that everybody is using them and they're no longer novel. In the latter years of the last millennium so many images with cross-processing were used in advertising that I began to wonder if perhaps evil photo labs were at work trying to undermine our color perception. Now, more than five years later, the technique has fallen out of favor again, so I'm including it in this book in case you need a retro-punk look for an image you're working on.

Cross-processing is nothing more than a technique in which color film is processed in the wrong chemicals. For example, color negative film can be developed in solutions intended for color transparencies, yielding a dark blue-tinged positive image. Or, color slide film can be processed in color negative chemicals, creating an interesting negative image. Of course, the resulting negatives-cum-slides are much too dark to be used as slides, but they can be successfully reproduced in books and magazines. Likewise, the slides-cum-negatives lack the orange mask found in normal negative films, but still can be printed or reversed by a skilled darkroom technician. In both cases, the results are images with colors unlike any scenes found in nature or nightmare.

There are several methods for creating cross-processed images in Photoshop, but this is one of the easiest. Just follow these steps.

1. Open Cross Process from the website. The basic image looks like the one shown in Figure 3.15. It's a light image with bright skin tones, a combination that works well with Photoshop cross-processing techniques.

Figure 3.15. Start with this image.

Figure 3.15. Start with this image.

2. Use Layer > Duplicate to create a copy of the background layer.

3. Choose Image > Adjustments > Curves to produce the dialog box shown in Figure 3.16.

0 0

Post a comment