Figure 4.25. Set the Healing Brush characteristics from the drop-down dialog box.

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This document is crea t®0fflSBS!B®B3g BE35S5M2FEF Pilots. 16.—

File Edit I ii i d-je Ljyer Seltct Filter View Window HeJp

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4. Make sure the Source box is checked. That tells Photoshop to use the area where you Alt/Option + click as the source for the cloned pixels. If you mark the Pattern box instead, you can heal an area with a pattern of your choice.

5. Alt/Option + click in the area of the forehead to the left of the scar, and paint over the blemish with the Healing Brush. The defect will vanish.

6. Use the drop-down dialog box to reduce the size of the Healing Brush to about 15 pixels, and repeat the operation on each dust spot, wrinkle, or other defect you see.

If the area you are working on is small, you can use the Spot Healing Brush, and not bother with selecting an area to sample. This tool is smart enough to produce good results on its own.

The Patch tool works in a similar way to the Healing Brush, except that you make a selection in your image of an area to be used as a patch, and then apply the patch to the destination area of the image. Scroll down to the right cheek area (your right, not the model's) and zoom in. Then, follow these steps.

1. Activate the Patch tool from the Tool Palette. Mark the Destination box in the Options bar. This indicates that you'll be selecting an area that will be used as a patch. You'll see exactly how this works shortly.

2. The tool cursor turns into a crosshair, which you can drag to define the area to be used as a patch, shown in Figure 4.26.

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