Figure 6.10. Left to right you'll find reddish, greenish, and bluish color casts.

Saturation. That is, how much of the hue is composed of the pure color itself, and how much is diluted by a neutral color, such as white or black. Figure 6.11 shows the image with low, normal, and high saturation.

Figure 6.11. The image has low saturation (left), normal saturation (middle), and high color saturation (right).

Figure 6.11. The image has low saturation (left), normal saturation (middle), and high color saturation (right).

• Brightness/contrast. Brightness and contrast refer to the relative lightness/darkness of each color channel and the number of different tones available. If, say, there are only 12 different red tones in an image, ranging from very light to very dark, with only a few tones in between, then the red portion of the image can be said to have a high contrast. The brightness is determined by whether the available tones are clustered at the denser or lighter areas of the image. Pros use something called histograms to represent these relationships, but you don't need to bother with those for now. Figure 6.12 shows the image with the contrast and brightness set low, normally, and high.

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