Sepia Toning

Learn Photo Editing

Learn Photo Editing

Get Instant Access

In one sense, color photography predated black-and-white photography by a number of years. Early photographic processes like the daguerreotype all had sepia or bluish tinges to them. It took a while before truly color-neutral black-and-white photography became possible. We still equate sepia toning with old-timey photography. Who hasn't donned Civil War attire to pose for a family portrait reproduced in rich browns and light tans? While in modern times it's been necessary to use special toning solutions in the darkroom to achieve a warm sepia look, Photoshop can do the same thing with very little trouble. Try out the effect using the image sepia.pcx from the website, or use your own photo. Just follow these steps.

1. Start with a black-and-white image, like the one shown in Figure 3.50.

Figure 3.50. Start with a black-and-white image, convert it to color, and then use Photoshop's Hue/Saturation controls to add a tone.

[View full size image]

Figure 3.50. Start with a black-and-white image, convert it to color, and then use Photoshop's Hue/Saturation controls to add a tone.

[View full size image]

This document is created with trial version of CHM2PDF Pilot 2.16.100. 2. Convert the image to color using Image > Mode > RGB Color.

3. Choose Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation, or press Ctrl/Command + U to produce the Hue/Saturation dialog box.

4. Click the Colorize button, and then move the Hue slider to the 20 position for a sepia tone, or any other position on the scale for a blue, green, or yellow tone, as you prefer.

5. Move the Saturation slider to enrich or mute the tone. Click on OK to apply the toning effect.

6. Use Photoshop's Brightness/Contrast controls to give the image a somewhat washed-out, old-timey look if you like. The finished photo should resemble Figure 3.51.

Figure 3.51. Finish the effect with some extra contrast to give the photo an old-

timey look.

Figure 3.51. Finish the effect with some extra contrast to give the photo an old-

timey look.

You can also get a toned effect using Photoshop's Duotone feature.

1. While in Grayscale mode, choose Image > Mode > Duotone.

2. When the Duotone Options dialog box pops up, choose Duotone from the Type drop-down list.

3. Click the colored box next to Ink 2 to select a custom color for the second shade.

4. Click the spectrum in the center of the Custom Colors dialog box to choose a particular color range, then click on the exact color swatch you want from the patches on the left side of the dialog box, as shown in Figure 3.52.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Photoshop CS Mastery

Photoshop CS Mastery

Artists, photographers, graphic artists and designers. In fact anyone needing a top-notch solution for picture management and editing. Set Your Photographic Creativity Free. Master Adobe Photoshop Once and For All - Create Flawless, Dramatic Images Using The Tools The Professionals Choose. Get My Video Tutorials and Retain More Information About Adobe Photoshop.

Get My Free Videos


Post a comment