Choosing a viewing option

The first step is getting your image into the Fix Photo dialog box. Here's how:

1. Select the image you want to edit in the Photo Well.

If you're not sure how to select a photo, check out Chapter 2. You can bring only one photo into the Fix Photo dialog box at a time.

2. Choose EditOFix Photo.

You also can click the Fix button in the Shortcuts bar, shown in Figure 11-1. Or you also can right-click and choose Fix Photo from the context-sensitive menu. And if those aren't enough ways to get into Fix Photo, you also can just double-click the photo to enlarge it to a Single Photo view and then double-click it again.

You're prompted with a warning, shown in Figure 11-2, that says you are about to edit an original photo, but that the original file won't be changed. It also specifies where the edited photo will be saved.

If you've sufficiently digested the meaning of this message, and don't want to see this warning every time you access the Fix Photo dialog box, go ahead and check the Don't Show Again option.

j| MyCtUlej Ad°b» Phoriwhep Album fU. L'ltf VI** gdf f Ind iitjrtattft Qnttn* tl*Jp

Figure 11-1:

Album provides multiple ways to get an image into the Fix Photo dialog box.

tr

ISk^KI

nr

D

B

'-- „

S:3

ll*

1^1

Figure 11-2:

Album warns you that your original file won't be edited.

The warning disappears.

If you are fixing a previously edited photo, the warning will be a little different. It will say you are going to edit a previously edited photo, and your changes will be written to that file. And if you're editing a Photoshop file with multiple layers, you will get an additional warning that the edited photo will be flattened (a technical term that means smushed into a single layer called a Background). Again, your original image is still tucked away unaltered.

Figure 11-2:

Album warns you that your original file won't be edited.

rfjABE*

After you click OK, the Fix Photo dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 11-3.

You can resize the Fix Photo dialog box. Place your cursor in the bottom right corner of the dialog box until your cursor appears as diagonal double headed arrow. Drag to size. I recommend clicking the Maximize button in the upper-right corner to bring the dialog box to its max size. That way your image is as large as possible for your editing session.

4. Select a viewing option from the tabs in the upper-left corner.

Album provides you with four viewing options, as follows:

• Original: Shows your image appeared when you first imported it into Album. After you edit the image, the original view is the only place you can view the original, unedited photo (unless you undo your edits, which I describe later in this section).

After editing, the original photo is stored on your computer, but doesn't display in the Photo Well. The only version you can see in the Photo Well is the edited version.

• Before: Displays the photo as it looked when you launched the Fix Photo dialog box. This tab appears only if the photo has been previously edited.

Tabs

Editing options

Figure 11-3:

The Fix Photo dialog box holds your arsenal of editing weapons.

Tabs

Editing options

Figure 11-3:

The Fix Photo dialog box holds your arsenal of editing weapons.

Zoom controls Rotate

Revert to original

Image preview

Zoom controls Rotate

Revert to original

Image preview

• After: Displays the photo with all of the current edits that you've made since launching Fix Photo.

• Before & After: Shows both the Original (or Before) image and the After version. This is a great view for a side-by-side comparison.

When you've found a viewing option that satisfies you, move on to the following section, "Introducing editing tools."

0 0

Post a comment