Getting Vertical

Sometimes it's hard to fight comfort. Most photos are horizontal just for the mere fact that it is easier to hold the camera that way. That's fine for a lot of shots (such as the ubiquitous group photo and many landscape shots). But other subjects — portraits of one person, buildings, trees, waterfalls, mountain peaks, flowers, giraffes, Shaquille O'Neal, and so forth — lend themselves to a vertical format, as shown in Figure 19-10.

Figure 19-10:

Turn that camera! You may find that your composition is stronger in a vertical format.

Figure 19-10:

Turn that camera! You may find that your composition is stronger in a vertical format.

Turn the camera and look through the viewfinder to check if a vertical orientation lends itself to a stronger composition. Often, vertical images are more impactful because vertical lines by nature create a feeling of action, whereas horizontal lines create a feeling of harmony or tranquility. Vertical shots often help to fill the frame and either reduce useless space to the left and right of the subject or eliminate distracting background elements.

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