Letting a Story

This last tip can't really be quantified in technical terms. You just know it when you see it. When you look at an image and it evokes an emotional response from you, you will end up with a memorable photo. Maybe the image tells an immediate story or maybe the image is more mysterious. It draws you in and makes you yearn to know more. The bottom line is you want an image that carries a message.

Figure 19-11:

You don't have to trek to China to find leading lines, although you may not find a longer unbroken curve than the Great Wall.

Figure 19-11:

You don't have to trek to China to find leading lines, although you may not find a longer unbroken curve than the Great Wall.

So often people snap away capturing the obligatory "record" shots. I'm not suggesting that those photos are bad. I'm suggesting that you can turn a record into a work of art without a whole lot of extra effort.

Try to capture images that go beyond the obvious or cliche. Keep an eye out for the unexpected or unusual. Get off the beaten path. Sometimes it isn't the destination or event that produces the great photo. It is the trip along the way. That great shot of Grandpa feeding his grandchild before his first birthday party may be the image that wins everyone's heart rather than the obvious "kid playing with cake" shot. Maybe the shots of the Mayan ruins in Mexico were nice, but it was the photo you took of a young boy and his even younger brother, selling Popsicles from a push cart on the way to the ruins, that sticks in your mind.

Even mundane or routine events that show the bonds between people or give insight into a culture can yield those truly special images. Sometimes finding the right shot is a matter of chance; sometimes you need to take the time to build a relationship with the people or with the place. Learn to trust your instinct for those just-right shots.

334 Part vl:The Part of Tens

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