To display a soft proof:

1 Choose View > Proof Setup, and choose the proof profile space that you want to simulate:

• Custom soft-proofs colors using the color profile of a specific output device. Follow the instructions after this procedure to set up the custom proof.

• Working CMYK soft-proofs colors using the current CMYK working space as defined in the Color Settings dialog box.

• Working Cyan Plate, Working Magenta Plate, Working Yellow Plate, Working Black Plate, or Working CMY Plates soft-proofs specific CMYK ink colors using the current CMYK working space.

• Macintosh RGB or Windows RGB soft-proofs colors in an image using either a standard Mac OS or Windows monitor as the proof profile space to simulate. Neither option is available for Lab or CMYK documents.

• Monitor RGB soft-proofs colors in an RGB document using your current monitor color space as the proof profile space. This option is unavailable for Lab and CMYK documents.

• Simulate Paper White previews the specific shade of white exhibited by the print medium defined by a document's profile. This option is not available for all profiles and is available only for soft-proofing, not printing.

• Simulate Ink Black previews the actual dynamic range defined by a document's profile. This option is not available for all profiles and is available only for soft-proofing, not printing.

2 Choose View > Proof Colors to turn the soft-proof display on and off. When soft proofing is on, a check mark appears next to the Proof Colors command.

When soft proofing is on, the name of the current proof profile appears next to the color mode in the document's title bar.

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Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Adobe Photoshop can be a complex tool only because you can do so much with it, however for in this video series, we're going to keep it as simple as possible. In fact, in this video you'll see an overview of the few tools and Adobe Photoshop features we will use. When you see this video, you'll see how you can do so much with so few features, but you'll learn how to use them in depth in the future videos.

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