Using Help | Contents | Index

• Custom lets you adjust the black generation curve manually. Before choosing Custom, first choose an option (Light, Medium, Heavy, or Maximum) that is closest to the type of black generation you want. This gives you a black generation curve to use as a starting point. Then choose Custom, position the pointer on the curve, and drag to adjust the black curve. The curves for cyan, magenta, and yellow are adjusted automatically relative to the new black curve and the total ink densities.

Black generation examples:

A. No black generation (Composite image, CMY, K) B. Medium black generation (Composite image, CMY, K) C. Maximum black generation (Composite image, CMY, K)

3 If needed, specify values for Black Ink Limit and Total Ink Limit (the maximum ink density your press can support). Check with your print shop to see if you should adjust these values.

In the Gray Ramp graph, these limits determine the cutoff points for the CMYK curves.

4 If you selected GCR as the separation type, specify an amount for undercolor addition (UCA) to increase the amount of CMY added to shadow areas. Check with your print shop for the preferred value. If you are unsure of this value, leave it at 0%.

UCA compensates for the loss of ink density in neutral shadow areas. This additional ink produces rich, dark shadows in areas that might appear flat if printed with only black ink. UCA can also prevent posterization in subtle detail in the shadows.

Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Adobe Photoshop can be a complex tool only because you can do so much with it, however for in this video series, we're going to keep it as simple as possible. In fact, in this video you'll see an overview of the few tools and Adobe Photoshop features we will use. When you see this video, you'll see how you can do so much with so few features, but you'll learn how to use them in depth in the future videos.

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