Creating A "Pen And Ink" Sketch With A Watercqlqr Wash

33.1

© 2002 Gregory Georges

33.2

© 2002 Gregory Georges

33.1

© 2002 Gregory Georges

33.2

© 2002 Gregory Georges

ABOUT THE IMAGE

Flowering Urn Nikon 950 digital camera, Fine Image Quality setting, original 1200 x 1600 pixel image cropped and converted to a 1152 x 1600 pixel, 5.8MB .tif file

Of all the different art media there is, I particularly like watercolors with their often-blurry edges and transparent colors. Very loose pen and ink sketches with loosely defined shapes and lines with lots of character can also hold my interest. I think the looseness of these two types of artwork is what appeals to me. They can be suggestive and yet leave enough undefined to allow your imagination to fill in the remaining parts, quite like reading a book versus seeing a movie made from the same story. The photograph in Figure 33.1 shows an urn that I found on the front porch of a fancy home in Charleston, South Carolina. You might not think that it is possible to turn this digital photograph into a fine-art quality print on watercolor paper, but it is — try it. This is one of the many images in this book that just doesn't show well printed in the book compared to what it looks like printed full-size on quality textured fine-art paper with a photo-quality inkjet printer — it really does look quite good.

This technique shows how to transform a digital photo into a watercolor-like image and a pen and ink sketch, then how the two can be combined to become a pen and ink sketch with a watercolor wash. Because it really is two techniques in one, it is a long technique. However, it is well worth trying on the urn image, and then on one or more of your own photos. I think you will like the results.

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