Step 2: Convert To Duotone

■ As you cannot directly convert an RGB image into a Duotone, choose Image ^ Mode >-Grayscale. Then choose Image ^ Mode >-Duotone to get the Duotone Options dialog box, which should look similar to the one shown in Figure 25.3. Click in the Type box and select Duotone.

■ To select the first color, click the color sample box for Ink 1 to get the Color Picker dialog box shown in Figure 25.4. To set black as the first color, type 0 in the boxes next to R, G, and B; alternatively, you can click in the Color Picker box and drag the selection marker all the way to the extreme bottom-right or bottom-left — then the values of R, G, and B are all set to 0. Click OK to set the color and return to the Duotone Options dialog box.

■ Click in the Color Sample box for Ink 2 to get the Custom Colors dialog box. If you get the Color Picker dialog box instead, click the Custom button to get the Custom Colors dialog box shown in Figure 25.5.

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Click in Book and select Pantone solid coated, which Scott has chosen for his portfolio prints. The color you want is Pantone 728 C, so type 7 to view the colors starting with a 7. Scroll down until you see Pantone 728 C; click it to select it. Click OK to select the color and return to the Duotones Options box.

■ To create more contrast and darker brown colors, Scott modified the Duotone Curves for both of the selected colors. Click in the Curves box for Ink 1 to get the Duotone Curve dialog box shown in Figure 25.6. Type 50 in the 30 box and then click OK to return to the Duotones Options dialog box. Do the same for the Pantone 728 C color; click in the Curves box for Ink 2 to once again get the Duotone Curve dialog box. Type 70 in the 50

box and click OK to return to the Duotone Options dialog box. Click OK to apply the Duotone.

■ To convert the image back to an RGB file, choose Image >- Mode >- RGB Colors. The image now looks like the one shown in Figure 25.2.

You have many issues to consider when using duo-tones, especially when manually adjusting duotone inks, which is a complex science. That is one of the reasons that Adobe provides so many preset curves for duotones, tritones, and quadtones settings. If you want to learn more about creating and using duotones, I highly recommend Professional Photoshop 7 — The Classic Guide to Color Correction, by Dan Margulis.

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CHAPTER

COMBINING PHOTOS IN MONTAGES, COLLAGES, AND COMPOSITES

This chapter is on combining images. First, we look at how to use the Photoshop 7 Extract feature to remove an object from a background image. After this task is complete, you have a photo object on a transparent background that is ready to be dragged and dropped onto any other image. Next is a fun technique that shows several different approaches to creating a photomontage. The end result of these techniques is a cool-looking building comprised of many parts of many old buildings — it is not a very inviting place — but it surely is amusing to look at. Then, we cover one of the most useful techniques in the entire book — a way to combine two bracketed photos into a single image with dynamic range that is much wider than can be captured with a digital or film camera. The last technique offers a collage mask and a technique that can be used to create a traditional photo collage. The photo collage is especially useful for Web pages.

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