Step 3: Crop Image

If you look toward the right side of the image, you will find a part of the image that no longer fits with the rest of the image. The break occurs where there is

a break in the white fence. The image to the right of the break in the fence needs to be cropped out.

■ Click the Crop tool (C) in Tools palette. In the Options bar, delete any values in the Width and Height boxes by clicking Clear in the Options bar.

■ Double-click the document window title bar to maximize it if it is not already maximized.

■ Choose View ^ Fit on Screen (Ctrl+0) to make the image as large as it can be and yet have all of it be visible.

■ Using the Crop tool, click just outside the upper-left side of the image; then drag the marquee down and to the right until you have all of the image selected up to the end of the white fence on the right side.

■ Press Enter to crop the image.

If you have enough RAM, I suggest that you now create a snapshot as this is a key state in this technique. To create a snapshot, click the menu button in the History palette to get a pop-up menu. Choose New Snapshot to get the New Snapshot dialog box. Type mirrored tree in the Name box and then click OK. You also can click the Create New Snapshot icon at the bottom of the History palette, but creating a

Master Diameter

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new snapshot this way does not allow you to name the snapshot while creating it. One other alternative is to press Alt while clicking the New Snapshot button and you will be prompted for a name. Pressing Alt when choosing a command or clicking a button usually means show a dialog box if you normally wouldn't or don't show a dialog box if you normally would.

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