Step 8: Creating Snapshots

Using the History palette just as a multiple undo/redo feature makes it a valuable feature, but it offers far more capabilities. Next, look at how it can be used for making snapshots. Snapshots are nothing more than temporary copies of your image at a specific history state; however they can be very useful.

If you scroll up to the top of the History palette as shown in Figure 4.14, you find a snapshot titled packard-before.tif. Ifyou don't see one, then your History palette settings are not set to Automatically Create First Snapshot. To set this option, click the menu button in the upper-right corner of the History palette to get a pop-up menu, and then choose History Options. Click in the box next to Automatically Create First Snapshot and then click OK to apply the settings. The next time you open up an image, it automatically creates this first Snapshot

4-13

for you. If you do not have a snapshot now, don't fret as it will not be needed for this technique.

Next we make some adjustments to the paint layer layer and make a snapshot that can be used in the next step.

■ Click in the paint layer to make it the active layer.

■ As we want richer colors, choose Image >-Adjustments ^ Hue/Saturation (Ctrl+U) to get the Hue/Saturation dialog box. Set Hue to 0,

MMMHJIJ

J

History

\

-j

*

packard-before.tif

H

nr

Open

m

Make Layer

&

Duplicate Layer

&

Free Transform

&

Motion Blur

m

Hue/Saturation

Mi

Add Noise

&

Duplicate Layer

Mi

Blending Change

Mi

Merge Down

[

Hue/Saturation

j

|

@ m tf

4.14

Saturation to 40, and Lightness to 0. Click OK to apply the settings.

■ Right-click in the last history state (it should be Hue/Saturation) in the History palette to get a pop-up menu. Choose New Snapshot to get the New Snapshot dialog box. Type rich colors in the Name box and click OK.

If you scroll to the top of the History palette, you should now see two snapshots, as shown in Figure 4.15; one named rich colors, which we just created, and one named packard-before.tif, which was created when the file was opened.

You may now be wondering what you can do with the snapshot we just created. Snapshots are similar to

History

\

*

w

packard-before.tif

A

L^ft

rich colors

Open

r

m

Make Layer

r

m

Duplicate Layer

J

r

u

Free Transform

r

m

Motion Blur

r

Hue/Saturation

r

si

Add Noise

r

si

Duplicate Layer

m

Blending Change

m

Merge Down

v

is] LJ£]

3?

a history state in the History palette, except you can name them, they don't get deleted when you run out of the maximum number of history states set in Preferences, and they show up at the top of the History palette with a thumbnail of the image at that particular state. If you saved a number of snapshots during an editing process, you could then flip through them to find the best one. Plus, you can use a Snapshot with the History Brush tool and the Art History brush as you do in the next step.

0 0

Post a comment