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How To Render Cars In Photoshop

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As I sought to show you as many tips as possible related to Photoshop's vast abilities related to drawing and painting, this chapter grew and grew. Therefore, when reading this chapter, be aware that its contents are a lot to digest in one sitting! That's the bad part. The good part is that the chapter's length and depth will help you get the most out of Photoshop's excellent toolbox of options for drawing and painting.

All about the Tools

Photoshop enables you to draw and paint pixels and vectors with paintbrushes, airbrushes, pencils, rubber stamps, sponges, and much more. In general, these can be grouped into three categories—paint tools, image editing tools, and shape tools.

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Paint Tools

Most of these tools give you the option to specify a blend mode—telling Photoshop how to handle the interaction between the edited pixels and those beneath them. See the Blending Modes section in the color insert for color representations of each blend mode.

The paint tools in Photoshop typically encompass the following tools—grouped into sets according to their location in the toolbox:

• Brush and Pencil

• History Brush and Art History Brush

• Gradient and Paint Bucket

• Eraser, Background Eraser, and Magic Eraser

Brush and Pencil

While both tools are used to paint with the current foreground color located in the toolbox, the Brush and Pencil tools in Photoshop also have distinct and easily identifiable differences. First and foremost, the Brush tool is capable of producing soft, anti-aliased edges, while the Pencil tool creates hard-edge, aliased lines. The other differences lie in the options for each tool, as discussed in Table 8-1.

Figure 8-1 shows where the Brush and Pencil tools are located in the toolbox, and the following illustration gives a quick look at some strokes applied with each tool.

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Press SHIFT-B on your keyboard to switch between the Brush and Pencil tools. Hold down the SHIFT key while dragging to draw a straight line with either tool.

History Brush and Art History Brush

The history brushes are different from the Pencil and normal Brush because they paint from the History palette instead of from the color in the foreground swatch of the toolbox. In fact, the History Brush and the Art History Brush don't really paint with specific colors at all. Instead, these two tools paint from specific states within the history of the image.

For example, suppose you wanted to restore a certain piece of an image to how it looked when you first opened the file. You can do so by painting back the area with the History Brush. (See the tip "Restore Part of an Image to the Previously Saved Version," later in this chapter.) Or suppose you applied a motion blur (Filter I Blur I Motion Blur) to an image of a woman riding a bicycle, but choose Edit I Undo because you didn't like how the blur looked on the entire image. You could use the Art History Brush to selectively paint back the motion blur only in the areas where it seemed appropriate.

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Figure 8-1 The Pencil tool is grouped with the Brush tool in the toolbox.

Brush Tool

Pencil Tool

Creates soft strokes

Creates hard-edged lines

Has an option for flow rate, which tells how quickly paint is applied by the brush

Has an option to auto-erase, where foreground color is "erased" to background color when foreground color is under the cursor as it's clicked

Has an option for opacity, which indicates the maximum amount of paint that can be applied at once

Has an option for opacity, which indicates the maximum amount of paint that can be applied at once

Has an option for blending mode, which controls how pixels are affected by the colors applied with the tool

Has an option for blending mode, which controls how pixels are affected by the colors applied with the tool

Can be used with a variety of brushes found in the Brushes palette

Can be used with a variety of brushes found in the Brushes palette

Can be used as an airbrush to spray jets of color applied in gradual tones

Table 8-1 Comparison of the Brush and Pencil Tools

Table 8-1 Comparison of the Brush and Pencil Tools

The key difference between these two types of history brushes is that, while they both paint from states within the History palette, only the Art History Brush allows you to edit the style, area, and tolerance of the brush strokes. The result is that strokes applied with the Art History Brush tend to be more "artistic" in nature than those applied with the History Brush. (See the tips "Restore Part of an Image to the Previously Saved Version" and "Use the Art History Brush to Combine Creative Effects.") Figure 8-2 shows where the History Brush and Art History Brush tools are located in the toolbox.

Gradient and Paint Bucket

When you want to quickly fill large areas with a single color, the Paint Bucket tool is the likely candidate. As shown in Figure 8-3, the Paint Bucket tool is grouped with the Gradient tool in the toolbox. The Gradient tool also allows you to fill large areas with as defined in the Gradient Editor. Both the Gradient and Paint Bucket tools can be applied to entire images or selected areas within an image. Additional characteristics and options for each tool are shown in Figures 8-4 and 8-5.

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Figure 8-2 The Art History Brush is grouped with the History Brush in the toolbox.

color, only it fills with gradations of one or more colors,

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Figure 8-3 The Paint Bucket tool is grouped with the Gradient tool in the toolbox.

Specify and edit style of gradient

Linear Angle Diamond gradient gradient gradient

Reverses colors in gradient when checked

Enables a gradient to fade to transparent when checked a

Mode: Normal

7] Opacity: |100H I »"] □ Reverse 0 Dither g Transparency

Access saved settings Radial Reflected Blend mode Creates a smoother blend for the gradient tool gradient gradient of gradient between colors when checked

Figure 8-4 Options for the Gradient tool

When filling with a pattern, select the pattern from this menu i

Blend mode for the fill

Creates soft edges along curves of fill when checked

Fills similar color areas on all layers when checked

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Access saved settings for the paint bucket tool

Specify contents of fill: foreground color or pattern

Specify a value between 0 and 255 to determine how wide an area is filled; the lower the number, the fewer similar colors filled

Fills only similar pixels that actually touch the one you click when checked

Figure 8-5 Options for the Paint Bucket tool

Eraser, Background Eraser, and Magic Eraser

The eraser tools (shown in Figure 8-6) are so named because, by default, they remove pixels of color from an image. However, depending on the options you assign to the tools, they can also be used to add pixels of color in an image.

When working with the Eraser tool, what appears after you "erase" depends on several things:

• If you're working on the Background layer or a layer whose transparency is locked, the Eraser erases to reveal the color currently located in the background color swatch.

• If you're working on any other layer, the Eraser erases to transparency (shown by the checkerboard pattern in Photoshop).

• If Erase To History is selected as an option of the Eraser tool, the Eraser erases to the selected state in the image's history. (See the tip "Restore Part of an Image to the Previously Saved Version" later in this chapter for details.)

QUICK TIP

Press SHIFT-G to switch between the Gradient and Paint Bucket tools.

QUICK TIP

Press SHIFT-E to switch between the eraser tools.

Both the normal Eraser and the Background Eraser give you the option of selecting a brush style and size. In addition, the normal Eraser also allows you to select a mode—Pencil, Brush, or Block. This means you can erase with the hard edges of the

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Figure 8-6 The Background Eraser and Magic Eraser are grouped with the normal Eraser in the toolbox.

Pencil tool, the soft edges of the Brush tool, or a flat, rectangular block similar to those chalkboard erasers from school.

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