Make File Extensions Web-Friendly

Because web graphics are housed and displayed on computers that may be different than the one on which they're created, they need to be named in a universally understandable way. There are a few key points to keep in mind when naming web files:

• Filenames are typically case-sensitive.

• Filenames cannot contain any spaces.

• Filenames are best limited to using the alphabet, numbers, and underscores (_) or dashes (-).

• Filenames must end with the appropriate three-letter file extension.

So while "my favorite page" is not a good filename, you could use myfavoritepage.html or my-favorite-page.html. Another common option is to capitalize the first letter of each word in the filename, as in MyFavoritePage.html. When using capitalization, it's important to always refer to the file exactly as you named it, because many web servers are case-sensitive. (This means that if you named your file MyFavoritePage.html but then later referred to it as myfavoritepage.html, a case-sensitive server would show a broken link.)

Depending on which operating system you use, you can customize Photoshop to save your file extensions in a web-friendly way, which saves you time in the long run. For example, Windows users can tell Photoshop to always make the file extensions of its files lowercase, while Mac OS users can specify that Photoshop should always save files with a file extension. This is important because the Mac OS itself doesn't require file extensions, even though web files do.

TRY IT To make your file extensions web-friendly, first choose Edit I Preferences I File Handling. To force Photoshop to save files with a lowercase file extension, Windows users should then select Use Lower Case from the File Extension menu.

To force Photoshop to automatically save all files with the appropriate three-letter file extension, Mac OS users should select Always from the Append File Extension menu. Then, place a check in the box next to Use Lower Case below that menu.

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