12 Creating Special Effects

The huge assortment of filters available for Adobe Photoshop lets you transform ordinary images into extraordinary digital artwork. You can select filters that simulate a traditional artistic medium a watercolor, pastel, or sketched effect or you can choose from filters that blur, bend, wrap, sharpen, or fragment images. In addition to using filters to alter images, you can use adjustment layers and painting modes to vary the look of your artwork. In this lesson, you'll learn how to do the...

Strategy for retouching

You can retouch photographic images in ways once available only to highly trained specialists. You can correct problems in color quality and tonal range created during the original photography or during image scanning. You can also correct problems in composition and sharpen the overall focus of the image. Photoshop provides a comprehensive set of color-correction tools for adjusting the color and tone of individual images. ImageReady has a more basic set of color-correction tools, including...

Getting started

Before beginning this lesson, restore the default application settings for Adobe Photoshop. See Restoring default preferences on page 5. The image you'll work on in this lesson is a scanned photograph. In this scenario, you'll prepare the image to be placed in an Adobe InDesign layout for a fictitious magazine. The final image size in the print layout will be 2 inches by 3 inches. You'll start the lesson by viewing the finished image. The picture you'll work on shows an interesting window with...

Using the tool options bar

Most tools have options that are displayed in the tool options bar. The tool options bar is context-sensitive and changes as different tools are selected. Some settings in the tool options bar are common to several tools (such as painting modes and opacity), and some are specific to one tool (such as the Auto Erase setting for the pencil tool). You can move the tool options bar anywhere in the work area. In Photoshop, you can also dock it at the top or bottom of the screen. The Photoshop tool...

Creating animations in Adobe Image Ready

In Adobe ImageReady, you create animation from a single image using animated GIF files. An animated GIF is a sequence of images, or frames. Each frame varies slightly from the preceding frame, creating the illusion of movement when the frames are viewed in quick succession. You can create animation in several ways By using the Duplicate Current Frame button in the Animation palette to create animation frames, and then using the Layers palette to define the image state associated with each...

Creating a custom workspace in Image Ready

To prepare for your ImageReady work with slices and rollovers, you'll streamline the work area by closing the palettes you won't need for these tasks and then resizing and arranging the ones you do need. By removing the clutter of unneeded palettes, you maximize your efficiency for these types of tasks. You'll save this arrangement as a custom workspace that you can reuse later. To get a sense of the workspace arrangement you're aiming for, see the illustration with the final steps of this...

Using channels and the Channels palette

Channels in Adobe Photoshop are used for storing information, and they play an important role in this lesson. Color channels store the color information for an image, and alpha channels store selections or masks that let you edit specific parts of an image. A third channel type, the spot-color channel, lets you specify color separations for printing an image with spot-color inks. For more information about channels, see Lesson ,6 Masks and Channels. In this lesson, you'll use all three types of...

Using the slice tool to create slices

Now that you've had a taste of how slices work, you'll start making changes to the sample project for this lesson. Using the slice tool, you'll define four user slices for buttons in the banner. 1 Choose File > Open, and open the file 15Start.psd from the Lessons Lesson15 15Start folder. If a notice appears asking whether you want to update the text layers for vector-based output, click Update. The lesson file includes blue horizontal and vertical guide lines. You'll use the guides and the...

Creating a knockout gradient layer

Knockout layer options specify how one layer reveals other layers. In this section, you'll create a knockout gradient layer so that the lower third of the image reveals the Background layer. You'll begin by creating a new layer in the Images layer set. 1 Select the Images layer set in the Layers palette and click the Create a New Layer button (j) at the bottom of the palette. This creates a new layer (Layer 1) in the Images layer set, above the Metal Grille, Curves 1, and Rust layers. 2...

Choosing basic optimization settings in Image Ready

Earlier in this lesson, you used Photoshop optimization settings that were integrated into the Save For Web dialog box. In ImageReady, the same options appear in the Optimize palette. 1 In ImageReady, choose File > Open, and open the file 14Start2.psd from the Lessons Lesson14 folder. This image was created in Adobe Illustrator, and then rasterized into Photoshop format. The image contains many areas of solid color. 2 Click the 2-Up tab in the image window. The optimized version of the image...

Optimizing slices in Photoshop

You can use Photoshop slices to optimize individual areas of the image, which is useful when some areas of the image require greater resolution or settings than the rest of the image. You optimize one or more slices by selecting them in the Save For Web dialog box, choosing optimization settings, and saving optimized files for either the selected slices or all slices. Photoshop creates an Images folder to contain the optimized files. Next, you'll optimize the four user slices you defined. 1...

Slicing the image in Image Ready

You've already learned several ways to create and work with slices in Photoshop, all of which can also be done in ImageReady. Although the options sometimes appear in different locations in the two applications, you can also use either Photoshop or ImageReady to create slices from guides or layers and to optimize individual slices. In this part of the lesson, you'll use ImageReady to convert a layer into a slice, create a No Image slice, and create a precisely shaped slice from a selection....

3 Basic Photo Corrections

Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady include a variety of tools and commands for improving the quality of a photographic image. This lesson steps you through the process of acquiring, resizing, and retouching a photo intended for a print layout. The same workflow applies to Web images. In this lesson, you'll learn how to do the following Choose the correct resolution for a scanned photograph. Crop an image to final size. Adjust the tonal range of an image. Remove a color cast from an image Auto...

Slicing an image in Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop lets you define slices using the slice tool or by converting layers into slices. You'll begin the lesson by slicing parts of a banner image for buttons using the slice tool in Photoshop. You'll name the slices and link them to URL addresses, and then optimize the slices. Then you'll continue slicing the banner image in ImageReady and create rollovers for the button slices. About designing Web pages with Photoshop and ImageReady When designing Web pages using Adobe Photoshop and...

Working with image maps (Image Ready)

An image map is an image that contains multiple hypertext links to other files on the Web. Different areas, or hotspots, of the image map link to different files. Adobe ImageReady creates client-side image maps and server-side image maps. Creating image maps is one of the functions that you must do in Adobe ImageReady. You can use Photoshop to create slices, which share certain functionality with image maps, but you cannot create image maps with Photoshop. Note For information about slicing an...

Straightening and cropping an image

You'll use the crop tool to trim and scale the photograph for this lesson so that it fits the space designed for it. You can use either the crop tool or the Crop command to crop an image. You can decide whether to delete or discard the area outside of a rectangular selection, or whether to hide the area outside of the selection. In ImageReady, the Hide option is useful when creating animations with elements that move from off-screen into the live image area. 1 In the toolbox, select the crop...

Saving a selection as a mask

Now you'll save the egret selection as an alpha channel mask. Your time-consuming work won't be lost, and you can use the selection again later. Quick masks are temporary. They disappear when you deselect. However, any selection can be saved as a mask in an alpha channel. Think of alpha channels as storage areas for information. When you save a selection as a mask, a new alpha channel is created in the Channels palette. (An image can contain up to 24 channels, including all color and alpha...

Starting Adobe Photoshop and opening files

The Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady work areas include the command menus at the top of your screen and a variety of tools and palettes for editing and adding elements to your image. You can also add commands and filters to the menus by installing third-party software known as plug-in modules. In this part of the lesson, you'll familiarize yourself with the Adobe Photoshop work area and open a file in Adobe Photoshop. Both Photoshop and ImageReady work with bitmapped, digitized images (that...

Optimizing images using Photoshop or Image Ready

Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady give you an effective range of controls for compressing the file size of an image while optimizing its on-screen display quality. Compression options vary according to the file format used to save the image. The JPEG format is designed to preserve the broad color range and subtle brightness variations of continuous-tone images (such as photographs or images with gradients). This format can represent images using millions of colors. The GIF format is...

Selecting tools in the toolbox

The toolbox contains selection tools, painting and editing tools, foreground- and background-color selection boxes, and viewing tools. This section introduces the toolbox and shows you how to select tools. As you work through the lessons, you'll learn more about each tool's specific function. 1 To select a tool, click the tool in the toolbox, or you can press the tool's keyboard shortcut. For example, to use the keyboard shortcut to select the zoom tool, press Z. Then, you can press M to switch...

Organizing an efficient sequence of tasks

Most retouching follows these six general steps Checking the scan quality and making sure that the resolution is appropriate for the way you will use the image. Cropping the image to final size and orientation. Adjusting the overall contrast or tonal range of the image. Adjusting the color and tone in specific parts of the image to bring out highlights, midtones, shadows, and desaturated colors. Sharpening the overall focus of the image. Usually, you should complete these processes in the order...

Selecting with the magnetic lasso

You can use the magnetic lasso tool in Photoshop to make freehand selections of areas with high-contrast edges. When you draw with the magnetic lasso, the border automatically snaps to the edge you are tracing. You can also control the direction of the tool's path by clicking the mouse to place occasional fastening points in the selection border. There is no magnetic lasso tool in ImageReady. You'll now move the padlock to the center of the black oval you placed on the book cover earlier in...

Combining paths into a filled shape

Your next task is to define the two circles as a single element, so that you can add a colored fill. 1 Using the path selection tool 0, select one of your circles, and then hold down Shift and select the second circle. Both paths are now selected. 2 In the tool options bar, click the Combine button. The Combine button is now dimmed because the two paths are now treated as one shape. 3 In the toolbar, click the Default Foreground And Background Colors button , which is to the lower left of the...

Using the Info bar

In Photoshop, the Info bar is positioned at the lower border of the application window Windows or the lower border of the image window Mac OS . This area displays the current magnification, an area for specific choices of information types, and context-sensitive information about the currently selected tool. In ImageReady, the Info bar appears at the lower border of the image window. You can click an arrow button on the Info bar to open a pop-up menu of different categories of information. Your...

Flattening a layered image

If you plan to send a file out for proofs, it's also a good idea to save two versions of the file one containing all the layers so that you can edit the file if necessary, and one flattened version to send to the print shop. When you flatten a file, all layers are merged into a single background, greatly reducing the size of the file. 1 First, note the values in the lower-left corner of the application window Windows or the 11Start.psd image window Mac OS . If the display does not show the file...

Creating a flag image and more text

In this section, you'll create a light red triangular shape for a flag in one layer and text in a separate layer. Before you begin, make sure that Layer 1 is selected in the Layers palette. 1 In the Layers palette, select Layer 2, and then click the New Layer button j to create another layer, Layer 3. 2 Select the polygon tool s , hidden under the ellipse tool . 3 In the tool options bar, do the following Select Fill Pixels the third of three buttons near the left end of the bar. Click the...

Automating a multi-step task

An action is a set of one or more commands that you record and can play back to apply that series of commands to a single file or a batch of files. In this section of the lesson, you'll see how the Actions palette can help you save time by applying a multi-step process to the four images you'll use in this project. Using actions is one of several ways that you can automate tasks in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady. To learn more about recording actions, see Photoshop 7.0 online Help.

Getting to Know the Work Area

As you work with Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady, you'll discover that there is often more than one way to accomplish the same task. To make the best use of the extensive editing capabilities in these programs, you first must learn to navigate the work area. In this lesson, you'll learn how to do the following Open an Adobe Photoshop file. Select tools from the toolbox. Use viewing options to enlarge and reduce the display of an image. This lesson will take about 60 minutes to complete....

Using the patch tool

The patch tool combines the selection behavior of the lasso tool with the color-blending properties of the healing brush tool. With the patch tool, you can select an area that you want to use as the source area to be fixed or destination area used to do the fixing . Then you drag the patch tool marquee to another part of the image. When you release the mouse button, the patch tool does its job. The marquee remains active over the mended area, ready to be dragged again, either to another area...

14 Optimizing Web Images and Image Maps

For effective Web publishing, your images must strike a good balance between file size and display quality. Using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady, you can optimize your images so that they have reasonable download times from a Web server without losing essential details, colors, transparencies, or navigational elements such as image maps. In this lesson, you'll learn how to do the following Optimize JPEG and GIF files, and adjust the optimization settings to achieve the desired balance...

Placing a custom shape

A custom shape, representing a golf ball balanced on a tee, has been created for you. In this scenario, the tournament organizers intend to print this image on various types of collateral items mailing letterheads, registration forms, advertisements, name tags, T-shirts, Web pages, and so forth that may be printed in different sizes and colors. You'll now load that shape into your Custom Shape picker and then use it in your poster for the golf tournament. 1 In the toolbox, select the custom...

Adding a gradient

Now you'll use the gradient tool to add a gradient to the other pear for a highlight effect. ImageReady does not have a gradient tool. Instead, gradients are created as ImageReady layer effects. First, you'll need to load the selection that you made earlier of the left pear. 1 Choose Select gt Load Selection, and select Left Pear. Click OK. A selection border appears around the left pear in your image. 2 Click the Color palette tab to bring it forward, and then select red as the foreground...

Drawing straight paths

Straight paths are created by clicking the mouse button. The first time you click, you set a starting point for a path. Each time thereafter that you click, a straight line is drawn between the previous point and the current point. 1 Using the pen tool, position the pointer on point A in the template and click the pen tool. Then click point B to create a straight-line path. As you draw paths, a temporary storage area named Work Path appears in the Paths palette to keep track of the paths you...

13 Preparing Images for Two-Color Printing

Not every commercially printed publication requires four-color reproduction. Printing in two colors using a grayscale image and spot color can be an effective and inexpensive alternative. In this lesson, you'll learn how to use Adobe Photoshop to prepare full-color images for two-color printing. In this lesson, you'll learn how to do the following Convert a color image to monochrome, and improve its overall quality. Adjust the tonal range of the image by assigning black and white points....

Adding spot color to text

Text in an image can also appear in spot color. There are different methods for creating this effect, but the most straightforward is to add the text directly to the spot-color channel. Note that text in a spot-color channel behaves differently from text created on a type layer. Spot-color-channel text is uneditable. Once you create the type, you cannot change its specifications, and once you deselect the type, you cannot reposition it. Now you'll add text to the spot-color channel and place...

Creating a layer-based slice

Another method for defining slices in Photoshop and ImageReady is to convert layers into slices. A layer-based slice includes all the pixel data in the layer. When you edit the layer, move it, or apply a layer effect to it, the layer-based slice adjusts to encompass the new pixels. To unlink a layer-based slice from its layer, you can convert it to a user slice. You'll create a slice based on the Copyright Strip layer, and then apply a layer effect to it so you can see how the slice adjusts to...

Combining selection tools

As you already know, the magic wand tool makes selections based on color. If an object you want to select is set against a differently colored background, it can be much easier to select the object and the background and then use the magic wand tool to subtract the background color, leaving the desired object selected. You'll see how this works by using the rectangular marquee tool and the magic wand tool to select the water lily. 1 Select the rectangular marquee tool hidden under the...

Opening and cropping the files

You'll start by opening and resizing four files. Since this part of the task involves aesthetic choices about where and how much of the image to crop, you'll do these steps manually rather than recording them with the Actions palette. 1 Choose File gt Open, and select the 12Start.jpg file, which is in the Lesson12 folder on your hard disk. 2 In the toolbox, select the crop tool -0. Hold down Shift and drag a square selection marquee around the pears. Holding down Shift constrains the selection...

Creating the simultaneous animations

Now you'll define the falling-drop animation by successively hiding and showing the layers of the Blender.psd file. You'll also build in the shaking-blender animation as the drop falls. All of this is done by coordinating settings in the Layers and Animation palettes. 1 In the Animation palette, make sure that frame 3 is selected, or select it now. 2 In the Layers palette, select Layer 1, and click the eye icon - boxes as needed to make only the Layer 1 and Drop layers visible hide the other...

Experimenting with slices in Photoshop

In this procedure, you'll learn not only some of the ways you can create slices, but also the difference between use slices and auto slices. User slices and auto slices also have different capabilities, which is the reason that it is important to understand the distinctions between them. User slices are areas that you actively designate as slices. Auto slices are the rectangular divisions of the remainder of the image all the areas that are outside of a user slice. Photoshop and ImageReady...

Importing a layer from another file

In this part of the lesson, you'll import an existing layer from another file into your artwork. Although the imported layer contains the word diesel and was originally created with the type tool, the text has now been converted to a graphic. You can no longer edit it with the type tool, but the advantage here is that you also don't have to worry about whether or not your users or other people working on the file have the same font installed on their machines in order to see the image...

Adding layers to complete the effect

Now, just for fun, you'll see how creating the selection with the pen tool can help you achieve interesting effects in an image. Because you've now isolated the space ship, you can create an exact duplicate of the selection on a new layer. Then, when you add a new object to a layer between the original layer and the duplicate saucer layer, that new object appears to be between the saucer and the starry sky background. 1 In the Layers palette, make sure that the background layer is selected, so...

Adding to a selection by erasing masked areas

Egret Photoshop Tutorial

You'll begin by painting with white to increase the selected area within the egret. This erases some of the mask. 1 To make the foreground color white, select the Switch Foreground and Background Colors icon above the foreground and background color-selection boxes. 2 Select the zoom tool 0 and magnify your view of the image, if needed. Many times when you are editing an image, you'll need to zoom in to work on a detail and then need to zoom out again to see the changes in context. You can use...

Stroking and filling paths

Earlier in this lesson, you used the Stroke command on the Paths palette menu to create colored pixels on straight paths. You can stroke or fill paths by dragging a named path onto one of the special buttons at the bottom of the Paths palette. To designate the painting options you want to apply to a path, you'll select a painting tool and paint options before you drag the path onto the appropriate button in the Paths palette. Note These Path palette buttons apply painting to the entire set of...

Applying the Zig Zag filter

Next, you'll use the ZigZag filter to create the impression that you're viewing the reflection of a dandelion on the surface of a rippled pool of water. 1 In the Layers palette, select the Dandelion layer. 2 Choose Filter gt Distort gt ZigZag. 3 At the bottom of the ZigZag dialog box, make sure that Pond Ripples is selected in the Style pop-up menu. Then experiment with different settings for Amount and Ridges by dragging the sliders. The example uses 10 for Amount and 11 for Ridges. When you...

Using online Help

For complete information about using palettes, tools, and the application features, you can use online Help. Photoshop Help includes all the same topics and information as in the printed Adobe Photoshop 7.0 User Guide. Adobe Photoshop and Adobe ImageReady each include complete documentation in online Help, plus keyboard shortcuts, full-color galleries of examples, and more detailed information about some procedures. Online Help is easy to use, because you can look for topics in several ways...

Experimenting with slices created from guides

In Photoshop and ImageReady, you can convert all the areas between guides into user slices. When you convert guides into slices, the entire image is sliced and you lose any preexisting slices. 1 Choose File gt Save, and then choose View gt Show gt and make sure that checkmarks appear by both Slices, Autoslices, and Guides commands. If not, select those commands now, as needed. 2 In the toolbox, select the slice select tool y , and then select the Designs_button slice in the image window. In the...

Minimizing browser dither

As you learned earlier, images that include non-Web-safe colors undergo a process of dithering when displayed in a Web browser using an 8-bit display, because the browser simulates colors that do not occur in the 8-bit system palette. From ImageReady, you can preview how an optimized image will look when dithered in a Web browser. To protect a color from browser dither, you can Web-shift the color, converting the color to its nearest equivalent in the Web palette. Because the Web palette...

Applying and fading the Accented Edges filter

The Accented Edges filter exaggerates the margins between areas with different colors. You can adjust the extent of the exaggeration by changing the edge brightness control, but in this procedure, you'll use a Fade command to mute the results. 1 In the Layers palette, select theLeaves layer. Make sure that you select the layer itself and not the adjustment layer. 2 Choose Filter gt Brush Strokes gt Accented Edges. Click OK to accept the default settings in the Accented Edges dialog box. This...

Hand-coloring selections on a layer

You'll start to add special effects to your montage by hand-coloring the pears, beginning with the pear on the right. To select it, you'll simply load the first selection you created in the previous procedure. Then, you'll remove the color from the selection so that you can color it by hand. Finally, after adding a layer above the pears, you'll be ready to apply new color by adding it to the new layer. In this way, you can simply erase the layer and start over if you don't like the results. You...

Preserving transparency and preparing to optimize

Next, you'll optimize the image in GIF format with background transparency and preview your animation in a Web browser. Remember that only the GIF format supports animated images. 1 Click the double-arrow button on the Optimize palette tab to expand the palette, or choose Show Options on the Optimize palette menu. No Transpa Amount lC0X 2 Set the following options on the Optimize palette For the file format, choose GIF. For the color reduction algorithm, choose Perceptual. For Colors, select a...

Adding transparency dithering to the drop shadow

Photoshop Optimize Pop Menu

As you've already learned, dithering is a method of creating gradations of color with a limited color palette. This makes it useful for Web pages because you can simulate smoother gradations without sacrificing small file size and quick downloads. 1 With the 14Start3.psd active, choose File gt Save for Web to open the Save for Web dialog box. This step is not necessary in ImageReady. 2 Click the Optimized tab in the Save for Web dialog box Photoshop or image window ImageReady . 3 On the right...

Tweening the position and opacity of layers

To finish the animation sequence, you'll add frames that represent transitional image states between the two existing frames. When you change the position, opacity, or effects of any layer between two animation frames, you can instruct ImageReady to tween, or automatically create intermediate frames. 1 In the Animation palette, make sure that frame 1 is selected then choose Tween from the palette menu. 2 In the Tween dialog box, set the following options if they are not already selected On the...

Creating a quick mask

Image Masking Photoshop Tutorial

Now you'll open the start file and begin the lesson by using Quick Mask mode to convert a selection border into a temporary mask. Later, you will convert this temporary quick mask back into a selection border. Unless you save a quick mask as a more permanent alpha channel mask, the temporary mask will be discarded once it is converted to a selection. You'll begin by making a partial selection of the egret using the magic wand tool, and then you'll edit the selection using a quick mask. 1 Choose...