And Noise Filters

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What You'll Do

In this lesson, you'll apply the Twirl filter to the Water layer and the Noise filter to the Yellow bar layer.

Understanding Distort and Noise Filters

Distort filters use the most memory, yet even a minimal setting can produce dramatic results. They create a 3-D effect or reshape an object. The Diffuse Glow filter mutes an image, similar to how classic film cinematographers layered cheesecloth or smeared Vaseline on the lens of a movie camera when filming leading ladies. Others, such as the Ocean Ripple, Glass, Wave, and Ripple filters make an object appear as if it is under or in water. The Twirl filter applies a circular effect to a layer. By adjusting the angle of the twirl, you can make images look as if they are moving or spinning. Figure 19 shows the diversity of the Distort filters.

Noise filters give an image an appearance of texture. You can apply them to an image layer or to the Background layer. If you want to apply a Noise filter to a type layer, you must rasterize it to convert it to an image layer. You can apply effects to the rasterized type layer; however, you can no longer edit the text.

Optimizing Memory in Photoshop

Many of the dynamic features in Photoshop are memory-intensive, particularly layer masks and filters. In addition to significantly increasing file size, they require a significant quantity of your computer memory to take effect. Part of the fun of working in Photoshop is experimenting with different styles and effects; however, doing so can quickly consume enough memory to diminish Photoshop's performance, or can cause you to not be able to work in other programs while Photoshop is running. You can offset some of the resource loss by freeing up memory as you work in Photoshop, and by adjusting settings in the Preferences dialog box.

Understanding Memory Usage

Every time you change your image, Photoshop stores the previous state in its buffer, which requires memory. You can control some of the memory that Photoshop uses by lowering the number of states available on the History palette. To change the number of states, open the Preferences dialog box, select the General topic, then enter a number in the History States text box. You can also liberate the memory used to store Undo commands, History states, and items on the clipboard by clicking Edit on the menu bar, pointing to Purge, then clicking the area you want to purge. It's a good idea to use the Purge command after you've tried out several effects during a session, but be aware that you cannot undo the Purge command. For example, if you purge the

FIGURE 19

Examples of Distort filters

History states, they will no longer appear on the History palette.

Controlling Memory Usage

Factors such as how much memory your computer has, the average size file you work with, and your need to multitask (have other programs open) can determine how Photoshop uses the memory currently allotted to it. To change your memory settings, click Edit on the menu bar, point to Preferences, then click Memory & Image Cache (Win). If you are using a Macintosh, click Photoshop on the menu bar, point to Preferences, click Memory & Image Cache, then change the amount of memory allocated to Photoshop in the Maximum Use by Photoshop text box. You should carefully consider your program needs before changing the default settings. For additional tips on managing resources, search the Adobe Web site Support Knowledgebase: www.adobe.comlsupport.

FIGURE 19

Examples of Distort filters

Apply a Twirl filter

1. Click the Water layer on the Layers palette.

2. Click Filter on the menu bar, point to Distort, then click Twirl.

3. Drag the Angle slider to 145, as shown in Figure 20.

I TIP The selection is rotated more sharply in the center of the selection than at the edges.

5. Click the Red bar layer on the Layers palette, drag it beneath the Water layer, then compare your image to Figure 21.

You applied a Twirl filter to the Water layer. You moved the Red bar layer beneath the water to complete the effect.

FIGURE 20

Twirl dialog box

FIGURE 20

Twirl dialog box

Angle setting can be changed using text box or slider

Correction lens distortion

Some distortions occur as a result of the camera lens. You can use the Lens Correction filter to counteract barrel (convex appearance), pincushion (concave appearance), and perspective distortions. You can also correct for chromatic aberrations and lens vignetting. These distortions can occur as a result of the focal length or f-stop in use. The Lens Correction filter can also be used to rotate an image, or fix perspectives caused by camera tilt. Click Filter on the menu bar, point to Distort, and then click Lens Correction.

Effect of Twirl filter -

FIGURE 21

Twirl filter applied to Water layer

FIGURE 21

Twirl filter applied to Water layer

FIGURE 22

Add Noise dialog box

FIGURE 23

Add Noise filter applied to type layer

FIGURE 22

Add Noise dialog box

FIGURE 23

Add Noise filter applied to type layer

Effect of Add Noise filter

FIGURE 24

Reduce Noise dialog box

FIGURE 24

Reduce Noise dialog box

Apply a Noise filter

1. Click the Yellow bar layer on the Layers palette.

2. Click Filter on the menu bar, point to Noise, then click Add Noise.

3. Drag the Amount slider to 30 (or type the value in the text box), then compare your dialog box to Figure 22.

TIP The Uniform setting distributes color values using random numbers between 0 and a specified value, while the Gaussian setting distributes color values along a bell-shaped curve for a speckled effect.

Flecks of noise are visible in the layer.

5. Save your work, then compare your image to Figure 23.

You applied a Noise filter to the active layer.

Reducing noise

While some images look better when you've added some noise, others can benefit from a little noise reduction. You can quiet things down using the Reduce Noise dialog box shown in Figure 24. Here you can adjust the strength, details, and color noise, and can also sharpen the image.

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