Colors

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Finding the Right Color

If it hasn't happened already, at some point you'll be working on an image and wish you could grab a color from another image to use in this one. Just as you can use the Eyedropper Tool to sample any color in the current image for the foreground and background, you can sample a color from any other image to use in the current one. Perhaps the skin tones in one image look washed out: you can use the Match Color command to replace those tones with skin tone colors from another image. Or maybe the jacket color in one image would look better using a color in another image.

Using Selections to Match Colors

Remember that this is Photoshop, where everything is about layers and selections.

To replace a color in one image with one you've matched from another, you work with—you guessed it—layers and selections.

Suppose you've located the perfect color in another image. The image you are working with is the target, and that image that contains your perfect color is the source. By activating the layer on which the color lies in the source image, and making a selection around the color, you can have Photoshop match the color in the source and replace a color in the target. To accomplish this, you use the Match Color command, which is available through the Adjustments command on the Image menu.

^ In this lesson, you'll make selections in source and target images, then use the Match Color command to replace the target color.

FIGURE 35

Selection in source image

FIGURE 35

Selection in source image

Selected area

FIGURE 37

Image with matched color

Selected area

Name oi' target image

FIGURE 37

Image with matched color

Layer -containing selection in source

Modified selection (your selection may look slightly different)

Name of source image

Layer -containing selection in source

FIGURE 36

Match Color dialog box

FIGURE 36

Match Color dialog box

Name oi' target image

Name of source image

Sample of layer in source

Modified selection (your selection may look slightly different)

Match a color

1. Click the Chili Peppers layer on the Layers palette, then zoom into the center of the image.

2. Click the Magic Wand Tool on the toolbox.

3. Verify that the Contiguous check box on the options bar is selected, then set the Tolerance to 160.

4. Click the image with the Magic Wand pointer on a yellow pepper at approximately 260 X/260 Y.

5. Open PS 4-3.tif from the drive and folder where your Data Files are stored, zoom into the image if necessary, change the tolerance to 40 then click the purple part of cat's nose (at 60 X/100 Y) with the Magic Wand pointer Compare your selection to Figure 35.

6. Activate the Chili Shop image, click Image on the menu bar, point to Adjustments, then click Match Color.

7. Click the Source list arrow, then click PS 4-3.tif.

Compare your settings to Figure 36.

9. Deselect the selection, zoom out to 100%, turn off the rulers, save your work, then compare your image to Figure 37.

10. Close all open images, then exit Photoshop.

You used the Match Color dialog box to replace a color in one image with a color from another image.

The Match Color dialog box makes it easy to sample colors from other images, giving you even more options for incorporating color into an image.

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