Snapshots

What You'll Do

In this lesson, you'll create a snapshot on the History palette, edit an image, then use the snapshot to view the image as it existed prior to making changes.

Understanding Snapshots

As mentioned earlier in this chapter, it is a good work habit to make a copy of an original layer to help you avoid losing any of the original image information. Creating a snapshot is like creating that new copy. The History palette can only record a maximum of 20 tasks, or states, that you perform. When the History palette reaches its limit, it starts deleting the oldest states to make room for new states. You can create a snapshot, a temporary copy of your image that contains the history states made to that point. It's a good idea to take a snapshot of the History palette image before you begin an editing session and after you've made crucial changes because you can use snapshots to revert to or review your image from an earlier stage of development. You can create multiple snapshots in an image, and you can switch between snapshots as necessary.

Creating a Snapshot

To create a snapshot, you can click the Create new snapshot button on the History palette, or click the History palette list arrow and then click New Snapshot, as shown in Figure 28. Each new snapshot is numbered consecutively; snapshots appear in order at the top of the History palette. If you create a snapshot by clicking the New Snapshot command, you can name the snapshot in the Name text box in the New Snapshot dialog box. Otherwise, you can rename an existing snapshot in the same way as you rename a layer on the Layers palette: double-click the snapshot, then type the name in the Name text box in the Rename Snapshot dialog box. You can create a snapshot based on the entire image, merged layers, or just the current layer. A snapshot of the entire image includes all layers in the current image. A snapshot of merged layers combines all the layers in the current image on a single layer, and a snapshot of the current layer includes only the layer active at the time you took the snapshot. Figure 29 shows the New Snapshot dialog box.

Changing Snapshot Options

By default, Photoshop automatically creates a snapshot of an image when you open it. To

FIGURE 28

Snapshot commands on the History palette

Default snapshot created when file is opened change the default snapshot option, click the History palette list arrow, click History Options, then select one of the check boxes shown in Figure 30. You can open files faster by deselecting the Automatically Create First Snapshot check box.

New snapshot

FIGURE 28

Snapshot commands on the History palette

Default snapshot created when file is opened

New snapshot

Opens the New Snapshot dialog box

Changes default snapshot options

Create new snapshot button

Opens the New Snapshot dialog box

Changes default snapshot options

QUICKTIP

Photoshop does not save snapshots when you close

FIGURE 29

New Snapshot dialog box

FIGURE 29

New Snapshot dialog box

Selects which layers to include in the snapshot

Create new snapshot button

FIGURE 30

History Options dialog box

History Options m

0 Automatically Create First Snapshot

□ Automatically Create New Snapshot When Saving

□ Allow Non-Linear History

□ show New Snapshot Dialog by Default

□ Make Layer Visibility Changes Undoable

Cancel a

Create a snapshot

1. Deselect any selections in Peppermint.psd.

2. Click Image on the menu bar, point to Adjustments, then click Invert. See

Figure 31.

3. Click the History palette list arrow • , then click New Snapshot.

4. Type After Color in the Name text box, as shown in Figure 32.

The newly named snapshot appears on the History palette beneath the snapshot Photoshop created when you opened the image.

You deselected the selection in the Peppermint image, inverted the color in the image, then created and named a new snapshot.

FIGURE 31

Inverted image

FIGURE 31

Inverted image

FIGURE 32

New Snapshot dialog box

FIGURE 32

New Snapshot dialog box

Type snapshot name here

FIGURE 33

Original snapshot view

FIGURE 33

Original snapshot view

Use a snapshot

1. Click the PS 9-2.psd snapshot on the

History palette, then compare your image to Figure 33.

The image returns to its original color.

2. Click the After Color snapshot on the History palette.

3. Close Peppermint.psd, save any changes. You used the snapshot to view the image as it was before you made changes.

What You'll Do

In this lesson, you'll create a picture package of the current image and then create a folder containing a contact sheet of images.

Learn Photoshop Now

Learn Photoshop Now

This first volume will guide you through the basics of Photoshop. Well start at the beginning and slowly be working our way through to the more advanced stuff but dont worry its all aimed at the total newbie.

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