Tool To Select Objects

What You'll Do

image in the new image, and move it to the Market Fresh image. You'll also readjust the Eyedropper Tool sample size, reselect and move the image so you can compare the selection difference, then delete the incomplete layer and position the complete layer in the Market Fresh image.

Understanding the Magic Wand Tool

You can use the Magic Wand Tool to select an object by selecting the color range of the object. The Magic Wand Tool lets you choose pixels that are similar to the ones where you first click in an image. You can control how the Magic Wand Tool behaves by specifying tolerance settings and whether or not you want to select only contiguous pixels on the options bar. The Magic Wand Tool options bar is shown in Figure 21.

Learning About Tolerance

The tolerance setting determines the range of colors you select with the Magic Wand Tool. For example, if you select a low tolerance and then click an image of the sky, you will only select a narrow range of blue pixels and probably not the entire sky. However, if you set a higher tolerance, you can expand the range of blue pixels selected by the Magic Wand Tool. Each time you click the Magic Wand Tool, you can choose from one of four buttons on the options bar to select a new area, add to the existing area (the effect is cumulative; the more you click, the more you add), subtract from the existing area, or intersect with the existing area.

QUICKTIP

You can also press and hold [Shift] and repeatedly click to add pixels to your selection, or press and hold [Alt] (Win) or [option] (Mac), then click to subtract pixels from your selection.

Using the Eyedropper Tool and the Magic Wand Tool

The Contiguous and Tolerance settings are not the only determinants that establish the pixel area selected by the Magic Wand Tool. The area that the Magic Wand Tool selects also has an intrinsic relationship with the settings for the Eyedropper Tool. The sample size, or number of pixels used by the Eyedropper Tool to determine the color it picks up, affects the area selected by the Magic Wand Tool. To understand this, you need to first examine the Eyedropper Tool settings.

Understanding Sample Size

When the Eyedropper Tool sample size is set to Point Sample, it picks up the one pixel where you click on the image. When the sample size is set to 3 by 3 Average, the Eyedropper Tool picks up the color values of the nine pixels that surround the pixel where you click the image and averages them. The sample area increases exponentially to 25 pixels for the 5 by 5 Average setting. The sample size of the Eyedropper Tool influences the area selected by the Magic Wand Tool. Figure 22 shows how different Eyedropper Tool sample sizes change the Magic Wand Tool selections, even when you sample an image at the same coordinates and use the same tolerance setting. As you become familiar with the Magic Wand Tool, it's a good idea to verify or change the Eyedropper Tool sample size as needed, in addition to changing the tolerance setting.

FIGURE 21

Magic Wand Tool options

FIGURE 21

Magic Wand Tool options

Click to open the Tool Preset picker list arrow

New Add to Subtract selection selection from selection

Intersect with selection

Number of Select to pixels to smooth include edges of images elect to select adjacent pixels

Select if images consist of multiple layers

Click to open the Tool Preset picker list arrow

New Add to Subtract selection selection from selection

Intersect with selection

Number of Select to pixels to smooth include edges of images elect to select adjacent pixels

Select if images consist of multiple layers

FIGURE 22

Selection affected by Eyedropper Tool sample size

FIGURE 22

Selection affected by Eyedropper Tool sample size

The sample size affects the number of pixels selected

The sample size affects the number of pixels selected

Fewer pixels selected using Point Sample with Magic Wand

More pixels selected using 5 by 5 Average sample with Magic Wand

Select an object using the Magic Wand Tool

1. Verify that the Fruit and Vegetables layer is the active layer.

2. Open PS 9-2.psd from the drive and folder where your Data Files are stored, then save it as Peppermint.psd.

3. Drag the Peppermint.psd window to the right side of the workspace, as shown in Figure 23.

4. Click the Eyedropper Tool X on the toolbox, then set the Sample Size to 5 by 5 Average on the options bar.

5. Click the Magic Wand Tool on the toolbox.

6. Type 50 in the Tolerance text box on the options bar, then press [Enter] (Win) or [return] (Mac).

7. Deselect the Contiguous check box (if it is selected).

TIP If the Contiguous check box is selected, you'll select only the pixels sharing the same color values that are adjoining each other.

8. In the Peppermint window, click the bottom-left leaf at approximately 20 X/175 Y on the Info palette to select the peppermint plant, as shown in Figure 24.

9. Click the Move Tool N- on the toolbox.

10. Position the Move pointer Kj. over the bottom-left leaf, drag the plant in front of the lower orange quarter (and in front of the apples) in the Market Fresh image, then compare your image to Figure 25.

You opened a new file, set the Eyedropper Tool sample size to its largest selection setting, used the Magic Wand Tool to select the Peppermint image you opened, then moved the selected image into the Market Fresh image.

FIGURE 23

New image opened and positioned

FIGURE 23

New image opened and positioned

Selected object moved to current image

FIGURE 26

Comparison of selections

Compare objects selected using different sample sizes

FIGURE 26

Comparison of selections

FIGURE 27

Selection positioned in image

FIGURE 27

Selection positioned in image

1. Click Window on the menu bar, then click Peppermint.psd.

2. Click Select on the menu bar, then click Deselect.

3. Repeat Steps 4 through 10 in the previous steps, but this time, set the sample size for the Eyedropper Tool to Point Sample in Step 4 and drag the plant above the green apple in Step 10.

4. Verify that the Show Transform Controls check box is selected on the options bar, then compare the two plants in the Market Fresh image, as shown in Figure 26.

TIP You can see the difference in the plants more easily if you hide and then display the Apples layer. Your results may vary from the sample.

5. Delete Layer 2 on the Layers palette.

6. Verify that the Move Tool is selected and Layer 1 (with the Peppermint plant) is active, click the top of the peppermint plant with the Move pointer Kj., then drag it so it is centered behind the leftmost tomato at approximately 70X/200 Y.

7. Hide the rulers, deselect the Transform Controls check box, save your work, then compare your image to Figure 27.

You changed the Eyedropper Tool sample size to its smallest setting, reselected the plant, moved it to the Market Fresh image, deleted one new layer, then repositioned the peppermint plant image.

CREA

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