Using the Patch Tool

The Patch Tool provides a quick and easy way to repair or remove an area within an image. You can use the Patch Tool in the following ways:

■ Select the area you want to fix, click the Source option button on the options bar, then drag the selection over the area you want to replicate.

■ Select the area you want replicated, click the Destination option button on the options bar, then drag the selection over the area you want to fix.

QUICKTIP

There's not necessarily one "right tool" for any given job: there might be several methods of completing a task. It's up to you to figure out which tool can be used to do the job. Remember, many Photoshop tasks might take several tries before you get the results you want. Hang in there and just keep trying.

FIGURE 1

Painting samples

TABLE 1: Painting Tools

tool

button

effect

Smudge Tool

jJ

Smears colors across an image as if you dragged your finger across wet ink. (Hidden under the Blur Tool.)

Sharpen Tool

A

Increases contrast between pixels, giving a sharp, crisp look. (Hidden under the Blur Tool.)

Blur Tool

6

Decreases contrast between pixels, giving a soft, blurred look.

Dodge Tool

*

Lightens underlying pixels, giving a lighter,

&

underexposed appearance.

Burn Tool

Darkens underlying pixels, giving a richer, overexposed

0

appearance. (Hidden under the Dodge Tool.)

Sponge Tool

Increases or decreases the purity of a color by saturating or desaturating the color. (Hidden under the Dodge Tool.)

Use the Sharpen Tool

1. Start Photoshop, open PS 6-1.psd from the drive and folder where your Data Files are stored, then save it as CyberArt.

2. Display the rulers in pixels (if they are not already displayed) and make sure the document size displays in the status bar.

3. Click the Sharpen Tool A on the toolbox.

I TIP Look under the Blur Tool if the Sharpen Tool is hidden.

4. Click the Click to open the Brush Preset picker list arrow ■ Tj ■ on the options bar.

5. Scroll down the list, and double-click 19 (Hard Round 19 pixels).

6. Drag the Brush pointer O from 20 x/20 Y to 530 X/20 Y, to sharpen across the top area of the image.

7. Press and hold [Shift], click the image in the lower-right corner at 530 X/530 Y, then release [Shift].

TIP Instead of dragging to create a line from point to point, you can click a starting point, press and hold [Shift], click an ending point, then release [Shift] to create a perfectly straight line.

8. Press and hold [Shift], click the image in the lower-left corner at 20 X/530 Y, then release [Shift].

9. Press and hold [Shift], click the image in the upper-left corner at 20 X/20 Y, then release [Shift]. Compare your image to Figure 2.

You used the Sharpen Tool to focus on the pixels around the perimeter of the image. The affected pixels now appear sharper and crisper.

FIGURE 2

Results of Sharpen Tool

FIGURE 2

Results of Sharpen Tool

Your document size may be different

FIGURE 3

Results of Burn Tool

Burn an area

FIGURE 3

Results of Burn Tool

Burned areas

Painting with a pattern

Suppose you have an area within an image that you want to replicate on a new or existing layer. You can create a tiled effect using the desired area and the Pattern Stamp Tool. To create this effect, select the Rectangular Marquee Tool using a 0 pixel feather setting, then drag the outline around an area in your image. With this area outlined, click Edit on the menu bar, click Define Pattern, type a name in the Name text box, then click OK. Deselect the marquee, click the Pattern Stamp Tool on the toolbox, click the Click to open Pattern picker list arrow on the options bar, then click the new pattern. Each time you click the pointer on a layer, the new pattern will be applied. You can delete a custom pattern by right-clicking the pattern swatch in the Pattern picker, then clicking Delete Pattern.

1. Click the Burn Tool on the toolbox.

I TIP Look under the Dodge Tool if the Burn Tool is hidden.

2. Click the Click to open the Brush Preset picker list arrow on the options bar, then scroll to and double-click 27 (Soft Round 27 pixels).

TIP You can change any brush tip size at any time. Press [[] to increase the brush tip or []] to decrease the brush tip in increments of 10.

3. Drag the Brush pointer Ofrom 20 x/25 Y to 550 X/25 Y.

Did you notice that the area you painted became darker? It looks as though the edges are burned.

4. Drag the Brush pointer O back and forth throughout the upper-right corner from 400 X/25 Y to 530 X/120 Y. Compare your image to Figure 3.

You used the Burn Tool to tone down the pixels in the upper-right corner of the image. This technique increases the darker tones, changing the mood of the image.

Set fade options and paint an area

1. Click the Eyedropper Tool on the toolbox.

2. Use the Eyedropper pointer ^ to click the image at 50 X/490 Y, as shown in Figure 4.

3. Click the Brush Tool y, on the toolbox.

4. Click the Click to open the Brush Preset picker list arrow on the options bar, then double-click 19 (Hard Round 19 pixels).

5. Click the Toggle the Brushes palette button

D on the options bar.

6. Click Shape Dynamics on the Brushes palette (if it is not already selected), then adjust your settings using Figure 5 as a guide.

The Brushes palette will automatically close when you begin painting. Available fade options and their locations on the Brushes palette are described in Table 2.

TIP Click the option name on the Brushes palette to see the option settings. Selecting an option's check box turns the option on, but doesn't display the settings.

7. Press and hold [Shift], drag the Brush pointer O from 25 x/25 Y t0 525 x/25 Y>

then release [Shift].

8. Use the Brush pointer O to click the image at 25 X/40 Y, press and hold [Shift], click the image at 25 X/520 Y, then release [Shift], as shown in Figure 6.

You modified the fade options, then painted areas using the Brush tool.

FIGURE 4

Location to sample

FIGURE 4

Location to sample

Indicates how many steps it takes for fade to occur

FIGURE 6

Areas painted with fade

FIGURE 6

Areas painted with fade

Faded areas

FIGURE 5

Brushes palette

Indicates how many steps it takes for fade to occur

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TABLE 2: Fade Options

option

description

on Brushes palette

Size Jitter

Decreases the brush stroke size toward the end of the stroke.

Shape Dynamics

Opacity Jitter

Decreases the brush stroke opacity toward the end of the stroke.

Other Dynamics

Color

Causes the foreground color to shift to the background color toward the end of the stroke. Available in the following tools: Brush and Pencil J?.

Color Dynamics

FIGURE 7

Marquee surrounding source area

FIGURE 7

Marquee surrounding source area

Selection to be patched

FIGURE 8

Results of Patch Tool

The location of your fisherman may vary

FIGURE 8

Results of Patch Tool

The location of your fisherman may vary

Patch an area

1. Click the Patch Tool O on the toolbox.

I TIP Look under the Healing Brush Tool if the Patch Tool is hidden.

2. Drag the Patch Tool pointer o around the periphery of the glass, being sure to complete the loop so you create the selection as shown in Figure 7.

3. Click the Source option button on the options bar, if it's not already selected.

4. Drag the selection so that the outline of the left edge of the glass (the outline source) is at approximately 60 X/170 Y.

TIP You can reverse steps using the History palette, then retry until you're satisfied with the results.

The selection is replaced with imagery from the location that you defined with the selection. As you drag, you'll see the pixels that will be replacing the selection. When finished, the horizon should be aligned.

Click Select on the menu bar, then click Deselect.

Click the Fisherman layer on the Layers palette and display the layer.

Click the Move Tool on the toolbox, then press the arrow keys as needed until the right side of the man covers any remnants of the glass. Compare your image to Figure 8.

Selecting and patching are difficult skills to master. Your results might differ.

8. Click the Scene layer on the Layers palette.

9. Save your work.

You used the Patch Tool to cover an area within an image. The tool makes it possible to correct flaws within an image using existing imagery.

Photoshop Secrets

Photoshop Secrets

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