Painting with the Brush tool

You control where the Brush tool works by selecting a brush tip of a particular size, shape, and hardness (the fuzziness, or lack thereof, along the edges of a round brush tip). Remember, too, that you can use the Brush and other painting tools to create subtle changes in existing colors. By selecting an appropriate blending mode and opacity, you can mix the painting color into the existing colors in your image. Make these basic decisions from the Options bar, shown for the Brush tool in Figure...

Painting in Photoshop

Adding color manually for complete control Discovering tools with brushes and tools without Traversing that amazing Brushes palette Creating do-it-yourself brushes M ainting. The word evokes images of brushes and palettes and color being precisely applied to canvas. Or, perhaps, images of rollers and buckets, color being slopped on a wall and spread around. It doesn't generally bring to mind digital image editing. But painting certainly has a place in your arsenal of Photoshop skills, even if...

Bringing Images into Photoshop

Artwork in Photoshop originates in one of three ways (as shown in Figure 4-1) i You import an image (typically through a scanning device). i You create an image from scratch with the FileONew command. Figure 4- 1 Open an image, scan an image, or create a new image to work in Photoshop. You can open an image into Photoshop with the FileOOpen command, through Adobe Bridge, or by double-clicking the image file. If you doubleclick a file and Photoshop doesn't launch or the wrong program launches,...

Part III: Creating "Art" in Photoshop

The chapters in Part III take a walk on the creative side. Although not everyone wants to use Photoshop as a digital painting program, everyone should understand how to get around in the complex and daunting Brushes palette. Compositing images (making one picture from two or more), adding text (whether a simple copyright notice or an entire page), using paths, and adding layer styles are all valuable skills for just about all folks who work with Photoshop (even if they don't consider their work...

Exploring Adobe Photoshop

Photoshop is used for an incredible range of projects, ranging from editing and correcting digital photos to preparing images for magazines and newspapers to creating graphics for the Web. You'll also find Photoshop in the foren-sics departments of law enforcement agencies, scientific labs and research facilities, and dental and medical offices, as well as in classrooms, offices, studios, and homes around the world. As the Help Desk Director for the National Association of Photoshop...

Other things you can do with Photoshop

Although Photoshop is not a page layout or illustration program, you certainly can produce simple brochures, posters, greeting cards, and the like using only Photoshop. (See Figure 1-4.) One of the features that sets Photoshop apart from basic image editors is its powerful type engine, which can add, edit, format, and stylize text as capably as many word processing programs. Photoshop even has a spell check feature not bad for a program that's designed to work with photos, eh Figure 1-4 You can...

Streamlining Your Work in Photoshop

Taking advantage of Photoshop's built-in automation commands Working with Actions Using prerecorded scripts J lot of the work that you do in Photoshop is fun experimenting with filters, applying creative adjustments, cloning over former in-laws, that sort of thing. A bunch of your work, though, is likely to be repetitive, mundane, and even downright boring. That's where automation comes in. If a task isn't fun to do, if you need to speed things up, or if you need to ensure that the exact same...

Using Photoshop's toning toots

You have a couple more ways to work with tonality in Photoshop the toning tools. These two brush-using tools let you paint corrections on your image, giving you incredible control over the appearance. Select the Burn tool to darken or the Dodge tool to lighten. Select a brush tip in the Options bar and drag the tool in your image to apply the correction. (Read about controlling the brush-using tools and that incredibly-complex Brushes palette in Chapter 14.) In Figure 5-19, you see the Burn...

Common Problems and Their Cures

Perfecting portraits of people Hushing the noise in your images Editing your digital landscape Sometimes you take perfect photos of imperfect people, and sometimes you take imperfect photos of, well, imperfect people. (Even the top models benefit from a little Photoshopping.) Although capturing absolute reality is the goal of some artists and most photojournalists, the people in your photos probably prefer to look as good as you (and Photoshop) can make them look. In this chapter, I present you...

Browsing the Brushes Palette

Photoshop's Brushes palette provides a bewildering array of options, sure to confuse even the most diligent explorer. Thankfully, unless you intend to create fine art paintings digitally, you can safely ignore a whole bunch of options. You must have a brush-using tool active to access the Brushes palette. If the active tool doesn't use brushes, the entire palette is grayed out and unavailable. If that's the case, simply press B on the keyboard to activate the Brush tool. The Brushes palette,...

When Good Programs Go Bad: Fixing Photoshop

Tools don't work right. Simple commands take ages to execute. Photoshop (gasp ) crashes Don't give up, and please don't toss the machine through the window. (Hey, I might be walking past at the time.) Start with the easy fixes and work your way up as necessary. l Check the palettes and selection. If a tool isn't working as expected or is not working at all, check whether you're inadvertently preventing it from doing its job. See whether you have an active...

Filters: The Fun Side of Photoshop

Being productive with fix it filters Getting artsy with creative filters Adding wackiness (and precise correction) with Liquify Taking a quick look at the specialized filters 7he Photoshop CS2 Filter menu includes over 100 commands that you can use to fix, flatter, finesse, and freak out your photos. You can use most of the filters on most of your artwork and some of the filters on some of your artwork, and you probably won't ever use a number of the filters. In this chapter, I start you off...

Welcome to Photoshop!

What Photoshop does very well, kind of well, and just sort of, well . . . Taking a look at what you need to know to work with Photoshop J dobe Photoshop is, without question, the leading image editing program in the world. Photoshop has even become somewhat of a cultural icon. It's not uncommon to hear Photoshop used as a verb (That picture is obviously Photoshopped ), and you'll even see references to Photoshop in the daily comics and cartoon strips. And now you're part of this whole gigantic...

Your platter full of palettes

Photoshop (and the other programs of the Adobe Creative Suite) uses floating palettes. The palettes, many of which you see along the right edge of your screen, always appear on top of (float over) your image window. The image window will never hide your palettes. (Palettes, however, can hide other palettes.) The Options bar (across the top of the work area) and the Toolbox (or toolbar) along the left edge of the screen are also palettes. Palettes contain Photoshop features that you might need...

Using Photoshop's Auto Corrections

Adjusting the tonality of your image can be as simple as selecting one of the Auto commands from Photoshop's ImageOAdjustments menu. With many photos, the tonality (and even the color) jump to just the right look for your image. No muss, no fuss just a great-looking picture with a single command. If you need to do something special with the image (for example, create an unusual effect), or if the image is in bad shape to begin with, the Auto commands might not be your best bet. But remember...

The Fitters You Realty Need

Photoshop has a number of filters that you can use on just about any image to improve or finesse it. Most photos, for example, benefit from at least a little bit of sharpening to improve the detail in the image. In some cases, you want to decrease the visible detail in an image in areas to hide defects, or perhaps you blur a background to draw more attention to the subject of your shot. And Photoshop CS2 has a couple of new filters that you'll find handy for correcting lens distortion and...

Discovering Photoshop's Painting Tools

Nothing in Photoshop gives you more precise control of color in your image than using the Pencil tool with a 1-pixel brush. Remember that your image consists of a whole lot of little colored squares (pixels) and that the color of those individual squares is what produces the appearance of a tree or a sunset or even good ol' Uncle Bob. If you zoom in really close on an image, you can paint pixel by pixel you could even create an entire image, one pixel at a time Whether you're using a tiny brush...

Using Shadow/Highlight

The Shadow Highlight adjustment is designed to rescue two specific sorts of images you've seen them (and maybe taken them) The background is perfectly exposed, and the person in the foreground is in horrible shadow. Or, equally bad, the background looks great, but the subject is washed out by a strong flash. (See both examples in Figure 5-15.) By controlling the shadows and highlights separately from the rest of the image, this feature helps you restore more balance to the image. Figure 5-15...

Sugar and spice, shortcuts are nice

Photoshop's keyboard shortcuts can save a bunch of time. Rather than mousing to the Toolbox to select the Brush tool, just press B on the keyboard. To open the Levels dialog box, press +L Ctrl+L instead of mousing to the Image menu, down to the Adjustments submenu, and then over and down to Levels. Photoshop CS2 has customizable keyboard shortcuts. Because the default set of shortcuts is pretty standard not only throughout the Adobe Creative Suite but also with other major programs you're...

The Detail tab

You have three sliders on the Detail tab to control sharpness and noise in your image. I suggest that as soon as you click the Detail tab, you zoom in to 200 (or even 400 ) on an area of shadow in your image and drag the three sliders all the way to the left, setting them to 0 (zero). Leave the Sharpness slider at 0 do your sharpening in Photoshop's Smart Sharpen (or Unsharp Mask) filter, where you have a Radius slider to control how the sharpening is applied to the image. Drag the Color Noise...

Part I: Breezing through Basic Training

The first set of chapters presents the basic operation of Photoshop, what you need to know to get around in the program, and the core process of getting images into Photoshop and back out again. If you're new to digital imaging, and particularly unfamiliar with Photoshop, make sure to read Chapter 1 through Chapter 3. If you've worked with Photoshop or another image editing program and aren't quite sure about the concept of resolution or which file formats are best for which purposes, don't...

What Photoshop is designed to do

Adobe Photoshop is an image editing program. It is designed to help you edit images, digital or digitized images, photographs, and otherwise. This is the core purpose of Photoshop. Over the years, Photoshop has grown and developed, adding features that supplement its basic operations. But at its heart, Photoshop is an image editor. At its most basic, Photoshop's workflow goes something like this You take a picture, you edit the picture, and you print the picture (as illustrated in Figure 1-1)....

Photoshop's incredible selective Undo

Here is one major difference between Photoshop and other programs you use. Almost all programs have some form of Undo, enabling you to reverse the most recent command or action (or mistake). Like many programs, Photoshop uses the +Z Ctrl+Z shortcut for Undo Redo (but remember that you can change the shortcut, as described in Chapter 3). Photoshop also has, however, a couple of great features that let you partially undo. Painting to undo with the History Brush You can use the Photoshop History...

What 1s Color in Photoshop?

Photoshop works with digital images (including digital photos, images that have been digitized with a scanner, and artwork that you create from scratch in Photoshop). The digits are the computer code used to record the image's information. The number of pixels, the color of each pixel, and any associated information are all recorded in a series of zeros and ones on your hard drive. Color, therefore, is nothing more than numbers at least as far as Photoshop is concerned. For you and me, however,...

Resolving image resolution

Image resolution is nothing more than an instruction to a printing device about how large to reproduce each pixel. Onscreen, when working in Photoshop, your image has no resolution at all. An image that's 3000 pixels wide and 2000 pixels tall looks and acts exactly the same in Photoshop whether you've got the image resolution at 300 ppi or 72 ppi. Same number of pixels, right You can always check or change a picture's resolution by using the Photoshop ImageOImage Size command. The Image Size...

Histograms Simplified

In most photographs of general subject matter, your eye sees the darkest neutral (gray) tone as black and the lightest neutral as white. (If the darkest color is obviously purple and the lightest a bright yellow, you probably wouldn't classify the photo's subject as general.) In a given image, the shadow under the shoe might be just a dark gray, and the shirt looks like it might need some bleach, but your eye (in cooperation with your mind) compensates to some degree and lets you see black and...

Installing Photoshop: Need to know

If you haven't yet installed Photoshop CS2 (or the Adobe Creative Suite), here are a few points to keep in mind l Install only into the default location. Photoshop is a resource-intensive program. Installing it into the default location (Applications on a Mac Program Files for Windows, as shown in Figure 1-13) ensures that it has access to the operating system and hardware as necessary. Installing into any other location or attempting to run Photoshop across a network can lead to frustrating...

Vanishing Point!

Perpendicular Planes

When combining images to create a scene, you might find a need to add texture or a pattern along what is supposed to be a three-dimensional object. You might, for example, add a product box to a photo of a kitchen and need to add a logo to the front of the box. Or maybe you will create a room, perhaps in a castle high on a hill, and you'll need to add a realistic stone texture to the walls. Use the new Photoshop CS2 Vanishing Point feature to map a pattern to angled surfaces, such as walls,...

Standing orders: Setting the Preferences

Photoshop's Preferences file stores a whole lot of information about how you use the program. Whether you prefer to measure in inches or pixels, how you like the grid and guides displayed, what size thumbnails you prefer in your palettes, which font you used last all sorts of data is maintained in the Prefs. Much of the info in the Preferences is picked up automatically as you work such as the size and color mode of the last new document you created, whether the Character palette was visible...

Posterize

The Posterize command forces your image's broad range of colors into a few selected colors as shown in Figure 6-18 . You automatically get black and white, and then a limited number of additional colors, based on the content of the original. You pick the number of colors that you want to use, and Photoshop picks which colors to use. You can use as few as two colors plus black and white or as many as 255 which pretty much gives you your original image . Posterize can create a rather pleasing...

Photo Fitter

Photoshop's Photo Filter is indeed an image adjustment rather than a filter. The filter in the name refers to those actual photographic filters that you screw onto the end of a lens. This adjustment is a great way to correct problems with temperature in an image that perceived warmth or coldness of an image. When the camera takes a picture under unexpected lighting conditions, a color problem is apparent. Say, for example, that the camera is set to Daylight when shooting indoors. When an image...