Adjusting Images

Original photo

Often, you'll find yourself working with photos that just aren't all that great. You know what I'm talking about. We've all seen them (you may even have taken some of them!): the overexposed, the underexposed, the "whoops I forgot to turn on the flash," and the scary red-eye snaps. It's just as well that we've made friends with Photoshop, because it has some handy tools thatwe canusetosalvage those photos.

In the following solutions, I'll introduce you to these tools. However, the ways in which you use them will depend on the images you work with. Feel free to make adjustments to make these techniques work for you!

Using Overlay blend mode

Target: rnatchcolor.psd (mother chil..., RGB/8)

D Ignore Selection when Applying Adjustment

Luminance 100

0 Preview

Using Overlay blend mode

Target: rnatchcolor.psd (mother chil..., RGB/8)

D Ignore Selection when Applying Adjustment

Luminance 100

Color Intensity

Fade

0 Preview

Image Statistics

0 Use Selection in Source to Calculate Colors 0 Use Selection in Target to Calculate Adjustment

Source: j motherchild^.psd |y Layer: mother child photo 2 v merit

| Load Statistics... | i Save Statistics... i merit

Making Whites Whiter

Solution

In this solution, I'm working with a winter photograph that looks like it was taken with a twice-dropped disposable camera. As you can see, the original photo is very dim, and the snow looks gray and dingy.

Gradient...

Pattern,,,

| Normal

Levels... rv

Curves... 1 Color Balance... Brightness/Contrast,,,

Lock: □ J 4*

K3phot

Hue/Saturation... Selective Color... Channel Mixer,,, Gradient Map,,, Photo Filter...

Threshold...

F^terize,,,

Creating a new adjustment layer

Original photograph

Let's fix it. Click on the Create new fill or adjustment layer button at the bottom of the Layers palette, and choose Levels... from the menu that appears, as shown in the image on the left.

Creating a new adjustment layer

The Levels dialog box will appear. Make the snow whiter by clicking and dragging the Input Levels white slider arrow towards the left, as shown in the example below. I've moved mine so that it's immediately beneath the end of the graph.

Increasing the whiteness

Increase the brightness of the image by dragging the gray slider arrow (the one in the middle) to the left, as shown in the example below.

Increasing the brightness

When you're satisfied, click OK to close the Levels dialog box. The example below compares the original photograph with my levels-adjusted image.

Original

With Levels Adjustment

Original

With Levels Adjustment

Original photograph compared with adjusted image
Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Adobe Photoshop can be a complex tool only because you can do so much with it, however for in this video series, we're going to keep it as simple as possible. In fact, in this video you'll see an overview of the few tools and Adobe Photoshop features we will use. When you see this video, you'll see how you can do so much with so few features, but you'll learn how to use them in depth in the future videos.

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