Figure 23.6

Printing to a file.

Print Selected Area—When this box (simply called Selection in Windows) is checked and you have a rectangular area currently selected in your Photoshop image, you can print just that area. This works only with rectangular selections created with the Marquee tool. Also, it doesn't work for feathered selections.

Encoding (can also be simply a check box for ASCII format)—Here you tell Photoshop which encoding method to use when it sends the image data to the printer. ASCII is understood by all PostScript printers, so it's a safe bet. Binary encoding is more compressed and thus can be faster, but it doesn't work on all printers. JPEG encoding is even faster, but it results in some loss of data because it's a lossy compression scheme. JPEG encoding works only with PostScript Level 2 printers.

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Print In—Here you can decide how to print the image: in grayscale, in RGB colors, or in CMYK colors. For some desktop printers, RGB gives better results. (If you're unsure, try both and see which looks better to you.)

Print Separations—This option appears in place of the Print In option, but only if the image is currently in CMYK or Duotone mode and the composite color channel is active. When you check this option, Photoshop prints each channel as a separate color plate. For example, a CMYK document would print as four separate pages, one for all the cyan data in the image, one for magenta, one for yellow, and one for black.

Options—Strangely enough, Options isn't always one of your options. On a non-PostScript printer, such as the HP DeskJet series, you'll see the Options button as one of your choices in the Print dialog box. Options lets you choose Intensity, Halftoning, and Color Matching. Leave all three at Auto unless you're printing a photograph. If you are, choose Photographic from the Color Matching menu to get the best possible color reproduction.

At long last, when everything's set to your satisfaction, click Print to print your image!

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