Figure 8.12

The Toning tools: Dodge, Burn, and Sponge.

Burning has the opposite effect of dodging—instead of lightening a small area, it darkens the area. In the darkroom, burning in is accomplished either by using a piece of cardboard with a hole punched out (the opposite of the Dodge tool) or by blocking the enlarger light with your hand, so the light only reaches the area on the print surface to be burned. Photoshop's Burn tool icon is a hand shaped to pass a small beam of light.

FIGURE 8.13

I lightened the tree and darkened the overexposed leaves.

Click the Dodge tool and look at the pop-up menu in the Tool Options bar. As you can see, it gives you three choices:

► Highlights

These options indicate the types of pixels that the tool will affect. If you want to adjust the shadows, such as making them lighter and leaving the lighter pixels untouched, select Shadows. The default option for the Dodge tool is Midtones. This is a good choice when you want to affect the midtone pixels, or when you are unsure of how to proceed. Select Highlights when you want to lighten already light-colored areas, leaving the darker areas untouched. Figure 8.13 shows the effects of dodging and burning on a picture shot outdoors in shade on a sunny day. This photo is also included in the Color Gallery.

FIGURE 8.13

I lightened the tree and darkened the overexposed leaves.

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