That '50s Look

Using blue as the second color along with black gives you an image that replicates an old black-and-white TV set. Using a light-to-medium brown with black gives a fairly good imitation of sepia, as does a combination of red and green. If you use red and green, though, be sure to use the same curve settings for both colors so that the image doesn't have reddish or greenish areas.

"Hand-Tinted" Photos

Years ago, before color film was readily available, it was common to see hand-tinted photos. These had been painstakingly overpainted with thinned-out special paints to add a pale suggestion of color to the picture. The Photoshop Brush and its

Airbrush option are well suited for re-creating the look of a hand-colored photograph. You can even do the whole Ted Turner routine and colorize stills from your favorite Marx Brothers movie or Bogart classic. (You can find lots of movie stills and movie star pictures on the web to practice on.)

After you have cleaned up the image that you want to hand-tint, change the mode back to color, either RGB or CMYK. Make a new layer and set the layer opacity to between 10% and 30%. Set the Brush opacity to 80% and paint your tints. Alternatively, leave the layer at 100% opacity, change its blending mode to color, and paint away!

If you have large, uncomplicated areas to tint, use one of the selection tools, such as the Lasso or the Magic Wand, to select the area. Select a foreground color and choose Fill from the Edit menu; a dialog box will appear.

Set the Opacity to about 25% and choose Multiply from the Blending Mode menu. Do not check Preserve Transparency. Set Foreground Color on the Use pop-up menu. Click OK to fill all the selected areas with your chosen color at that opacity. If it's not enough, either reopen the Fill dialog box and apply the fill again, or undo the Fill operation and redo it with a higher percentage. If it's too much, undo and try again with a lower percentage. Be sure to see the finished picture in the Color Gallery, as well as in Figure 21.24.

Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Understanding Adobe Photoshop Features You Will Use

Adobe Photoshop can be a complex tool only because you can do so much with it, however for in this video series, we're going to keep it as simple as possible. In fact, in this video you'll see an overview of the few tools and Adobe Photoshop features we will use. When you see this video, you'll see how you can do so much with so few features, but you'll learn how to use them in depth in the future videos.

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